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Drainage Layer Utilizing Periodical Standoffs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124467D
Publication Date: 2005-Apr-21
Document File: 4 page(s) / 97K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Instead of the installation of a coarse mesh layer to create the drainage layer, this concept incorporates periodic "standoffs" to create a drainage layer. These standoffs can be in the form of a ring of some thickness (thickness driving the stand-off desired) or any other material shape having desired thickness that can separate two layers to achieve this standoff. These standoffs can be spaced out as desired from less than an inch to several inches or several feet. The separation being governed by the stiffness of the adjacent layers which are being separated such that separation is maintained under all service conditions/environments.

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Title:              Drainage Layer Utilizing Periodical Standoffs

 

Author:          Mike Langlais

Introduction

A drainage layer, in premium or mesh sand screen terms, is a layer (can be two or more layers) in a stack-up of layers that provides a channel or open volume between two layers having limited flow-through area, i.e. filter mesh and shroud or filter mesh and base pipe.  This channel or open volume is created using some type of standoff between these adjacent, limited flow-through layers.  The channel or open volume improves fluid flow between the two layers by exposing the flow-through areas of the surrounding layers to the fluid.  By utilizing all the flow area of the flow-limited layers, i.e. shroud/mesh/base pipe, the flow velocities into the screen assembly are reduced which reduces erosion, which increases the life of the screen.

Currently drainage layers are achieved by installing a coarse wire mesh, such as a 2-mesh (4-mesh, etc.) or a coarse-wound wire tube, into the channel/volume where the standoff is required.  There are two significant drawbacks of the current methods for creating this drainage layer.  One is the difficulty in handling/manufacturing the product using the 2-mesh, for example, since it does not readily stay in place during assembly and the wires are easily damaged.  The other is the drainage layer significantly increases cost of the product.

Summary

Instead of the installation of a coarse mesh layer to create the drainage layer, this concept incorporates periodic “standoffs” to create a drainage layer.  These standoffs can be in the form of a ring of some thickness (thickness driving the stand-off desired) or any other material shape having desired thickness that can separate two layers to achieve this standoff.  These standoffs can be spaced out as desired from less than an inch to several inches or several feet.  The separation being governed by the stiffness of the adjacent layers which are being separated such that separation is maintained under all service conditions/environments.

 


Detailed Description

Figure 1 shows the typical construction of drainage layers between the flow-...