Browse Prior Art Database

amic Allocation of Conventional Channel Gateway Resources

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124553D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Apr-27
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 78K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

David Hughes: AUTHOR

Abstract

A Conventional Channel Gateway has been developed by Motorola which interfaces an customer's existing analog conventional channel resource to an IP based ASTRO 6.X trunked system. This CCGW is a dedicated device - in other words, for each conventional channel, a conventional channel gateway is set aside and 'hard wired'.

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A Conventional Channel Gateway has been developed by Motorola which interfaces an customer's existing analog conventional channel resource to an IP based ASTRO 6.X trunked system. This CCGW is a dedicated device - in other words, for each conventional channel, a conventional channel gateway is set aside and 'hard wired'.

There exists many large scale conventional systems where the quantity of dedicated conventional RF channel resources (per central office) can reach 50-100 channels. However the duty cycle or usage profile of these conventional channels is often very low (< 1 PTT per day).

Dedicating a Conventional Channel Gateway for each customer's dedicated conventional channel is wasteful in terms of quantity of dedicated equipment needed, costly in terms of its integration and provides no redundancy if the dedicated Conventional Channel Gateway receives a hardware or software failure.

ASTRO 6.X Vortex II operator positions and Conventional Channel Gateways affiliate to a specific conventional channel. Currently there is a fixed mapping between CCGW resource and the conventional channel identifier.  It is proposed to implement a dynamic mapping between a conventional RF channel and a dynamically assigned Conventional Channel Gateway resource, where the assignment of the CCGW is made by the Zone Controller (Z/C).

To facilitate the dynamic mapping of analog RF interfaces to the analog CCGW interfaces, a new function is necessary within the customer's existing console system.  A bridging console, based off call activity and hang time, would use the Gold Elite audio path patching capability to perform analog audio bridging, which is done internal within the console system’s Central Electronics Bank (CEB).  The bridging console would have a dedicated IP based communication link to the ASTRO 6.X Zone Controller, which provides the signaling to indicate call start and call stop.  Included with this call control data would be channel identification and necessary keying information such as frequency and PL selections.

The following is examples of message sequencing that describes the process of placing an inbound and outbound call through a dynamic Conventional Channel Gateway interface.

Inbound Call

1.       The customer places an inbound call on a channel within their conventional system.

2.       Audio is sent to the conventional system’s Central Electronics Bank and to the bridging console.

3.       The bridging console would indicate to the ASTRO 6.X system through the IP link to the Zone Contr...