Browse Prior Art Database

System for Real-Time Distribution of Media from Multiple Possible Sources to Heterogeneous Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124562D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Apr-27
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Jeffrey T. Eschbach: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This paper describes a system to distribute multimedia selected from multiple possible sources to heterogeneous devices in real-time.

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System for Real-Time Distribution of Media from Multiple Possible Sources to Heterogeneous Devices

Jeffrey T. Eschbach

Kabe Vander Baan


ABSTRACT:

This paper describes a system to distribute multimedia selected from multiple possible sources to heterogeneous devices in real-time.  The system receives notices which are associated with potential sources of available media, selects which media to distribute, and then distributes the media to multiple, heterogeneous clients using html.  This system is especially applicable to Public Safety environments, where many multimedia sources may be available and dynamic events require selected real-time information to be provided to emergency personnel, first responders, or other officers.

Within many possible environments and use cases, a system to distribute selected media in real time from numerous possible sources to multiple heterogeneous clients is valuable [1].  This paper describes a system to address this need.

The system consists of multiple media sources such as cameras, a central location called the server, and multiple receiving clients.  The sources generate multimedia content and other context-related information for users.  Media can be any data generated by a source that can be embedded in an html page (e.g., images, text, video, audio, etc).  Notices are sent to a server to indicate that some event or change in the environment has occurred (e.g., a picture was taken), and are associated with a location of some of the media sources in the system.  The server provides selected media to clients based upon known context and state within the environment.  Delivery of all messages and content are supported by a flexible, high-bandwidth infrastructure, such as a wired or wireless IP-based network.

The server is aware of incoming notices along with available media and information sources within the system, and it serves as a focal point for selecting which media to distribute to users.  The server uses a control channel (e.g., a known address and port) to receive the notices, which can originate from a media source, sensor, manual trigger, or other device capable of monitoring the environment.  Each notice can have multiple media or content sources associated with it (e.g., multiple images from a camera or multiple cameras), and may also include metadata information on how to access the media.  Using the server, some subset of the available media will be selected on an ongoing basis; either an individual makes the decision through a user interface, or an application or algorithm can automate the process.

After the media is selected, links to the media are embedded into an html document that can be accessed by clients.  The page’s URL does not change; however, the content of the page dynamically changes as different media is distributed.  A client simply accesses the same URL, and the page’s content will dynamically update.  The server could provide content to the URL either by s...