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Browse Prior Art Database

VLP-DIMM (Very Low-Profile DIMM)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124595D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Apr-29
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Apr-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed is a new memory module design, the VLP-DIMM (Very Low-Profile Dual Inline Memory Module), that fits vertically in a blade server.

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VLP-DIMM (Very Low-Profile DIMM)

VLP-DIMM (Very Low-Profile Dual Inline Memory Module)

    Currently, the memory DIMM sockets on a server blade often must be 25-degree angled due to mechanical restrictions. This allows the current standard Low Profile (1.2" high) DIMM's to be inserted into a blade and still get a 14 blade density in one rack system. On a blade, the DIMM's can take up a large amount of board space. This prevents other features from being added to the server in the space taken, including more memory DIMM's. Current configurations also create long stubs that seriously degrade memory signal quality and timings.

    In order to address the problems encountered with 25-degree angled DIMM's, the VLP-RDIMM (Very Low Profile Registered Dual Inline Memory Module) would allow vertical DIMM sockets to be used. It enables this through a new, smaller DIMM card form factor and layout and by utilizing the latest in memory device packaging. Using the VLP-RDIMM would significantly improve signal quality and timings, enabling faster memory to be used in the server without special data buffering. The VLP-RDIMM also uses the standard 5.25", 184-pin vertical socket for 2.5 or 2.6 volt DDR DIMM's, allowing it to be used in systems other than blades. In a standard blade server, 6-8 memory DIMM sockets could be placed vs. the current limit of 4. Alternatively, more room would be made for other IC's to add function, such as I/O features. More robust designs for power distribution...