Browse Prior Art Database

Response Time Sensitive Email Sender/Receiver

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124663D
Original Publication Date: 2005-May-03
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-May-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Numerous times, people send very large email attachments. This is generally not a problem when the recipient is using his computer attached to a LAN or high speed link. However, if using a phone modem, it can take hours to receive these email messages. Sometimes there are urgent messages or short messages that the user would like to receive, but they are 'stuck' behind a note with a very large attachment. Often the recipient has to wait until he returns to the office to receive his mail. This invention consists a self adjusting email download service that detects when receipt of the mail is talking longer than acceptable. Under these circumstances, the email service works with the human to selectively eliminate all mail with large attachments from the current download activity.

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Response Time Sensitive Email Sender /Receiver

Numerous times, people send very large email attachments. This is generally not a problem when the recipient is using his computer attached to a LAN or high speed link. However, if using a phone modem, it can take hours to receive these email messages. Sometimes there are urgent messages or short messages that the user would like to receive, but they are 'stuck' behind a note with a very large attachment. Often the recipient has to wait until he returns to the office to receive his mail.

There is existing technology for dealing with large email attachments. For example, some email programs optionally limit the size of incoming notes and allow the user to sort the arriving mail with the smallest messages first. However, heretofore, there seems to be no accommodation for processing an email download which is already in progress. Options for inhibiting large messages must be enabled before the user starts to receive his mail. Once the mail begins arriving, the only available course of action seems to be to abort the download.

This invention consists of a self-adjusting email download service that detects when receipt of the mail is talking longer than acceptable, perhaps by comparing the time to a threshold of 'n' minutes. Under these circumstances, the email service opens a dialog with the user to selectively eliminate mail with large attachments from the current download activity. The email service notifies the recipient of the number and size of large notes in the current download and the estimated time to load them. The user than can select whether to continue downloading that email or reserve the large documents for a later time. He could also optionally schedule the remainder of the download at a specific date and time, at his convenience.

Additional code will be required on both the email server and client. The client will need to detect slow response time for email downloads and send back an event to the server. This will be called a 'checkpoint' event. The server will interrupt the current download and save a pointer to the next byte to be sent. The server will then enumerate the individual email notes being downloaded along with their sizes and send this information to the email client code on the user PC in the form of an email message list.

The email client code on the user machine will estimate the download time for each message in the list, based on the number of bytes previously downloaded in 'n' minutes. This information will be added to the email list and presented to the user. The use...