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Diclosulam Tank Mixes for Burndown and Residual Weed Control in Florida Citrus in 2005

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124668D
Publication Date: 2005-May-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 85K

Publishing Venue

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Abstract

Diclosulam and norflurazon provide residual grass and broadleaf control when used in conjunction with glyphosate in Florida citrus orchards.

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Diclosulam Tank Mixes for Burndown and Residual Weed Control

in

Florida

Citrus in 2005

by Steve Futch1, Marvin Schultz2, and Tony Weiss3

Several difficult to control weed species in

Florida

citrus include

Brazil

pusley (Richardia brasiliensis), Forida pusley (Rhichardia scabra), Spanish needles (Bidens pilosa), dayflower (Commelina diffusa) and goatweed (Scoparia dulcis).  Glyphosate alone sometimes does not provide complete burndown of these weeds; and residual herbicides also sometimes allow escapes of these weeds.  Diclosulam, active ingredient in Strongarm herbicide, has good soil and post activity on Bidens and Commelina species; however little is known about its activity on Rhichardia and Scoparia species.  Therefore, field trials were initiated in 2005 to evaluate crop tolerance and control of all of these weed species with Strongarm in

Florida

citrus.  All treatments included glyphosate (

Durango

) plus a nonionic surfactant (Choice).  Trials also included some tank mix treatments of Strongarm + norflurazon (Solicam) to provide additional residual grass control.  All treatments were planned for three applications (about 120 days apart) on the same plots during the growing season – early spring, mid summer, and fall.

Trials were established at four locations in

Florida

in 2005.  Interim data available at the time of this report, from the first two locations (Ona and Immokalee) one month after application, is shown in Tables 1 and 2.  Final results will be reported at conclusion of these trials.

No injury was observed at 27 to 30 DAA with any of the treatments on the orange trees, which were transplanted 2.5 years (Ona) or 32 days (Immokalee) earlier.  Treatments were soil applied in a band under the canopy using a hooded tractor mounted sprayer.

All treatments provided good burndown control of weeds present at the time of application.  Weed control ratings were reported as percent ground cover for all weeds present at the time of rating, and for each individual weed species present in densities sufficient to rate.  Although weed pressure was still light at 27-32 DAA (1-4% ground cover), all treatments were providing at least some residual control of pusley species, bermudagrass, and other weeds rated (see Tables 1 and 2) vs. glyphosate alone.  Later evaluations with heavier weed pressure will show which treatments provide the best residual control of these weed species.

________________________________________________________________________

1 Extension faculty, Citrus Research and

Education

Center

,

Lake Alfred

,

FL

2 Dow AgroSciences,

Indianapolis

,

IN

3 Dow AgroSciences,

Cary

,

NC

Table 1.  Soil applied weed control in sweet oranges at

Ona

,

Florida

in 2005.

 

 

 

% Visual Ground Cover

 

 

Rate

4-20-05

(30 DAA)

Trt #

Treatment*

(g ai/ha)**

All Weeds

Pusley Spp.

1

Strongarm + Visor +

Durango

35 + 840 + 1680

1

a

0

b

2

Strongarm + Solicam +

Durango

26 + 2688 + 1680

1

a

0

ab

3

 

35 + 2688 + 1680

1

a

0

b

4

 

52 + 2688 + 1680

1

a

0

b

5

Strongar...