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Market-enabling communications protocol

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124713D
Original Publication Date: 2005-May-04
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-May-04
Document File: 2 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

E-markets today usually have a high cost of entry if they are centralized (i.e. someone must maintain a central(ized) structure) or have no certain way of ensuring desireable market participant actions if they are decentralized (gnutella, freenet), i.e. message distribution. A communication protocol is proposed that only permits participants to read the contents of a message after they have sent it on to others using the same protocol and received a specified number of responses which together make a key to decrypt the original message contents.

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Market-enabling communications protocol

E-markets today usually have a high cost of entry if they are centralized (i.e. someone must maintain a central(ized) structure) or have no certain way of ensuring desireable market participant actions if they are decentralized (gnutella, freenet), i.e. message distribution.

A communication protocol is proposed that only permits participants to read the contents of a message after they have sent it on to others using the same protocol and received a specified number of responses which together make a key to decrypt the original message contents.

By using a decentralized approach one avoids the costs associated with maintaining a centralized marketplace. A problem occuring in decentralized markets is that participants may have no interest in forwarding messages to others - in fact there can be an incentive not to do so in order to uniquely profit from the information in a message. The proposal solves the problem of non-dissemination of messages by forcing the participants to disseminate messages in order to be able to read them. The messages are encrypted such that they require a number of keys to open (the number and depth of required keys is called a key policy) that can only be obtained from others. The depth of a key is how many participants it must go through in order to be useable as part of the decryption. The keys that any user needs are linked both to the message and to the unique user-id of the copy of the software that they are using. The software for the protocol is s...