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RFID AS PRODUCT TRACKER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124800D
Publication Date: 2005-May-05
Document File: 3 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present invention relates to the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in medical devices for uses in addition to patient management.

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RFID AS PRODUCT TRACKER

            The present invention relates to the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in medical devices for uses in addition to patient management.

            Typically, implantable medical devices include telemetry capabilities for providing non-invasive access to data stored on the device. In order to access the data, a telemetry wand was passed over the body at the region of the implanted device. However, RFID technology has recently been incorporated into implantable medical devices as a means of both extracting patient data and reprogramming the device remotely. These devices have an embedded RF capability that allows them to communicate via an antenna. It is not necessary to pass a receiving device such as a wand over the device to access the data. Rather, if the device is within range of an RF scanner, data stored therein, such as patient data and device programming data, can be automatically and continuously uploaded and downloaded.

According to the present invention, an RFID system on a medical device is employed to facilitate device manufacture, testing and distribution. For example, according to various embodiments, an implantable medical device RFID system is employed to store device performance history, upload programs onto the device, allow the device to communicate with other machinery during manufacture, and communicate with automated tracking and tracing programs throughout manufacture and distribution processes.

            There are a variety of uses for RFID in the manufacture and distribution of medical devices. Rather than having to scan a paper barcode or a data matrix to output a device tracking number into the system, identifying information can be downloaded directly from the device to an automated tracking program. The device can provide its own backup to tracking and tracing programs by storing its own process sequence and device history record. Software can be downloaded and product testing can be performed on the device in parallel to other operations (i.e....