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Terminology for Describing Internet Connectivity (RFC4084)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124913D
Original Publication Date: 2005-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-May-12
Document File: 12 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

J. Klensin: AUTHOR

Abstract

As the Internet has evolved, many types of arrangements have been advertised and sold as "Internet connectivity". Because these may differ significantly in the capabilities they offer, the range of options, and the lack of any standard terminology, the effort to distinguish between these services has caused considerable consumer confusion. This document provides a list of terms and definitions that may be helpful to providers, consumers, and, potentially, regulators in clarifying the type and character of services being offered.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 11% of the total text.

Network Working Group                                         J. Klensin
Request for Comments: 4084                                      May 2005
BCP: 104
Category: Best Current Practice


            Terminology for Describing Internet Connectivity

Status of This Memo

   This document specifies an Internet Best Current Practices for the
   Internet Community, and requests discussion and suggestions for
   improvements.  Distribution of this memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

   Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2005).

Abstract

   As the Internet has evolved, many types of arrangements have been
   advertised and sold as "Internet connectivity".  Because these may
   differ significantly in the capabilities they offer, the range of
   options, and the lack of any standard terminology, the effort to
   distinguish between these services has caused considerable consumer
   confusion.  This document provides a list of terms and definitions
   that may be helpful to providers, consumers, and, potentially,
   regulators in clarifying the type and character of services being
   offered.

Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  2
       1.1.  The Problem and the Requirement  . . . . . . . . . . . .  2
       1.2.  Adoption and a Non-pejorative Terminology  . . . . . . .  2
   2.  General Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   3.  Filtering or Security Issues and Terminology . . . . . . . . .  5
   4.  Additional Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
   5.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   6.  Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   7.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9


Klensin                  Best Current Practice                  [Page 1]
RFC 4084                    IP Service Terms                    May 2005


1.  Introduction

1.1.  The Problem and the Requirement

   Different ISPs and other providers offer a wide variety of products
   that are identified as "Internet" or "Internet access".  These
   products offer different types of functionality and, as a result,
   some may be appropriate for certain users and uses and not others.
   For example, a service that offers only access to the Web (in this
   context, the portion of the Internet that is accessible via the HTTP
   and HTTPS protocols) may be appropriate for someone who is
   exclusively interested in browsing and in Web-based email services.
   It will not be appropriate for someone who needs to download files or
   use email more frequently.  And it is likely to be even less
   appropriate for someone who needs to operate servers for other user...