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FM Transdermal Microphone

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124915D
Publication Date: 2005-May-12
Document File: 3 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The present disclosure relates to an implantable cochlear stimulator (ICS) that aids the profoundly deaf to hear, and more particularly to an external microphone assembly used to convey transduced acoustic signals through the skin without the need for external power.

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FM Transdermal Microphone

Field of the Invention

                    The present disclosure relates to an implantable cochlear stimulator (ICS) that aids the profoundly deaf to hear, and more particularly to an external microphone assembly used to convey transduced acoustic signals through the skin without the need for external power.

Background

Cochlear implant technology allows those who are profoundly deaf to experience the sensation of sound.  Currently cochlear implant systems include both internal, or implanted, components and external, or non-implanted components.  Typically, the implanted components have comprised an implantable pulse generator (IPG) connected to a cochlear electrode array adapted to be inserted into the cochlea.  The external components have typically comprised an external microphone connected to an external speech processor, and a headpiece connected to the speech processor.  In operation, the external microphone senses airborne sound and converts it to an electrical signal.  The speech processor amplifies the signal and processes it in accordance with a desired speech processing strategy.  After processing, control signals, fashioned to be representative of the information contained within the sound sensed by the microphone, are coupled to the IPG through the headpiece, and the IPG responds to the control signals by applying electrical stimuli to selected electrodes on the electrode array.  Such electrical stimuli are sensed by the auditory nerve and transferred to the brain as the perception of sound.

                    Representative cochlear implant systems are described, e.g., in U.S. Patent Nos. 3,752,939; 4,357,497; 4,679,560; and 5,603,726.

Description

                    In ICS applications a microphone is connected to a small RF transmitter to couple a signal through the skin to a receiver mounted inside the body, but in most ICS a...