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Micro Fluidics Assisted Molecular Combing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000124928D
Publication Date: 2005-May-13
Document File: 3 page(s) / 192K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for aligning molecules (e.g. DNA and carbon nanotubes) by using micro fluidic techniques. Benefits include improved control over alignment and patterning.

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Micro Fluidics Assisted Molecular Combing

Disclosed is a method for aligning molecules (e.g. DNA and carbon nanotubes) by using micro fluidic techniques. Benefits include improved control over alignment and patterning.

Background

It is difficult to control and pattern the alignment of molecules (e.g. DNA and carbon nanotubes), and to integrate the patterning methods for the subsequent processing of the aligned molecules.

Currently, DNA alignment is performed by molecular combing and droplet drying methods. However, in these methods, patterning and controlling as well as integration have been significant issues. Carbon nanotube alignment after synthesis is achieved by AC dielectrophoresis; nanowire alignment is accomplished based on shear force.

The current state of the art uses micro fluidics to align semi-conducting nanowires, and makes cross-bar junction devices from the aligned nanowires. Such methods have not been successfully applied to nanotubes, because of the difficulty in isolating nanotubes in solution. But recently, this problem has been addressed by using DNA and other surfactants for the chemical functionalization of nanotubes.  

General Description

Figure 1 shows the disclosed method’s micro fluidic molecular combing. The micro fluidic device consists of a substrate that is modified or patterned so that the target sample binds to the substrate. The surface of mica with 3-aminopropyl triethoxy silane (APTES) is modified and positively charged for DNA molecules that are negatively charged, so that they interact electrostatically. The sample solution is placed in the sample reservoir and incubated for approximately 10 minutes (the time varies depending on the sample), and a vacuum is applied to the second reservoir to pull the sample solution through the channel to...