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MRAM with Reset Function

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000125700D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jul-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jul-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 18K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

In computer systems there are different types of memory for different uses, e.g. volatile memory and non-volatile memory. Non-volatility is normally a desired property of any non-volatile memory such as MRAM (Magnetic Random Access Memory). Also, this characteristic can be a handicap if the non-volatile memory is used as main memory in a computer system. One of the most important tasks of a system administrator is to reboot the system or to shut off the computer for a short time. This has the effect that the operating system, programs and data, which entered a "hung-up" state, expire from the memory, and the computer is restored in a well-defined virginal state. This does not work if the memory is non-volatile. The computer would sadly come up in the same "hung-up" state.

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MRAM with Reset Function

Idea: Dr. Daniel Braun, FR-Paris

In computer systems there are different types of memory for different uses, e.g. volatile memory and non-volatile memory. Non-volatility is normally a desired property of any non-volatile memory such as MRAM (Magnetic Random Access Memory). Also, this characteristic can be a handicap if the non- volatile memory is used as main memory in a computer system. One of the most important tasks of a system administrator is to reboot the system or to shut off the computer for a short time. This has the effect that the operating system, programs and data, which entered a "hung-up" state, expire from the memory, and the computer is restored in a well-defined virginal state. This does not work if the memory is non-volatile. The computer would sadly come up in the same "hung-up" state.

The idea solves the problem by providing the non-volatile memory with an active reset mechanism, which upon triggering (e.g. by a code word, or one or several voltage levels on particular control pins) writes explicitly zeros into the whole memory array. Such a mechanism can be provided on the chip level, or on a memory module level. Preferably, it consists of an autonomous address counter and switches (such as FET (Field Effect Transistor) devices), which can pull the data entries to logical 0. A reset mechanism of the same form provided by the computer itself (i.e. not integrated in the memory chips or the memory modules) is possible...