Browse Prior Art Database

Method for providing accessible access to touchscreen systems without additional controls

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000125721D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jun-14
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jun-14
Document File: 1 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Disclosed are two modes for touchscreen devices in order to provide an accessible interface as well as a full graphical interface, on the same screen. A separate, redundant, set of controls is not required, reducing cost and complexity particularly for upgrading existing touchscreen systems that are already in use. Problem: Touchscreens or contact-sensitive controls provide no tactile cues so they require the user to be able to see the areas of the screen in order to activate a touch control. Blind users cannot locate the areas of the touchscreen to activate the controls. Current solutions: Provide a redundant set of controls, for example using EZ Access features (http://trace.wisc.edu/faqs/ezfaq/).

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Method for providing accessible access to touchscreen systems without additional controls

Disclosed are two modes for touchscreen devices in order to provide an accessible interface as well as a full graphical interface, on the same screen. A separate, redundant, set of controls is not required, reducing cost and complexity particularly for upgrading existing touchscreen systems that are already in use. For example, while ATM machines often have screens with a separate key pad and function keys, many other kiosk applications have no controls other than a touchscreen.

    Extending the core idea, through the use of a bluetooth headset, would make it possible to switch to the accessible mode automatically and communicate privately with the user. This avoids the need to switch the mode manually, giving the user instructions from the moment they approach the screen, and gives a higher level of security than using speakers to give audio prompts.

    The accessible mode would use a combination of large areas on the screen, instead of buttons, with voice prompts to guide users. The location of these different areas would be indicated by ridges and/or braille around the edge of the screen, for blind users, and would also be indicated by high contrast differences in colour, for those with poor vision.

    Ideally, anyone wishing to use the system would use a small headset to hear voice prompts, although speakers could also be used, either as the only means providing audio or as a back up. This could be a simple set of headphones, a stand...