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A means for routing a human to human collaboration based on message context and user roles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000125722D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jun-14
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jun-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

With the proliferation of web technologies in general, many means of communication are provided beyond the scope of a standard telephone. Instant messaging, e-mail, SMS text messages are all examples of alternative communication channels. However, whilst the increased variety of communication channels is beneficial in terms of contacting a user, there are naturally occasions when a user is not focused on a particular channel e.g. a user walks away from their system but still appears on a buddy list as "active". Thus, the user can miss an incoming request.

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A means for routing a human to human collaboration based on message context and user roles

With the proliferation of web technologies in general, many means of communication are provided beyond the scope of a standard telephone. Instant messaging, e-mail, SMS text messages are all examples of alternative communication channels. However, whilst the increased variety of communication channels is beneficial in terms of contacting a user, there are naturally occasions when a user is not focused on a particular channel e.g. a user walks away from his system but still appears on a buddy list as "active". Thus, the user can miss an incoming request.

   There are some partial solutions to this problem in that a user can, for example, divert their phone to voicemail and divert e-mails to SMS but this is a rather simplistic approach. The diversion in each case is static in that all calls go to voicemail, all e-mail messages go to SMS. There may be situations where a user wants to interact with a subset of incoming requests. For example, a user may not wish to be disturbed but may still want to ensure that if someone needs to contact them that the message gets through. Furthermore, a problem may arise if a communication channel breaks down and thus a potentially urgent message will not get through.

   There is disclosed a system by which a chain of communication can be established between one user and another dependent on the context of the conversation and/or the role of the particular user sending the message.

    The system is based on the context and/or sender's role relative to the receiver, the message is routed through a particular set of communications channels according to a set of rules. These rules can be user defined statically (by means of a control panel for example) or they can be generated according to the user's behavioural patterns. The system comprises the following components:

A peer to peer communications system such as an instant messaging client.

A table of ranked available communications channels available to the user, e.g. SMS might rank higher than instant messaging since typically a user will have a mobile telephone on them when they are not at their desk. These channels form the chain of communication within the rules for given sets of context. This table of communications channels can be statically maintained by the user or modified dynamically e.g. when Bluetooth picks up the user's mobile phone in range, assume that the mobile phone is available as a means of contact.

A ranked set of context information e.g. key words ranked in order of their relative importance, so for example "customer" might be ranked higher than "shopping". Similarly an average time to respond to a given user can be used as a ranking, that is if a first user typically responds to a second user in a short space of time, the system can deduce that the first user would want to hear from the second user when the first user is away from their desk.

A set...