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Method for Handling an Initialization Failure of a Noncritical Component in a Computer Processing System Without Impacting the Users of the Component

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000125896D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jun-20
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jun-20
Document File: 3 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A method is disclosed for handling an initialization failure of a noncritical component in a computer processing system without impacting the users of the component.

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Method for Handling an Initialization Failure of a Noncritical Component in a Computer Processing System Without Impacting the Users of the Component

Introduction

A method is disclosed for handling an initialization failure of a noncritical component in a computer processing system without impacting the users of the component. The method allows all required components to run successfully even though an optional component is unable to start.

Overview

In a computer processing system, some functional components are required and some are optional. If a required component is unable to start, the system cannot operate. However, the system may be able to operate (albeit in a degraded manner) if an optional component is unable to start. The problem is to develop a method for allowing all required components to run successfully even though an optional component (used by the required components to do optional work) is unable to start. Each required component can check to see if the optional component has started before operating on the optional component, and only operate on the optional component if it has been started. Alternatively, each required component can attempt to operate on the optional component without checking to see if it has started, which means that each required component has to be able to run successfully even if an operation on an optional component cause a failure condition because the optional component has not been started. However, both of these solutions places a burden on all of the required components since each required component has to be able to deal with an optional component that is not running. This disadvantage is exacerbated if there are a very large number of required components, each of which has to be able to deal with an optional component that is not running.

The method being disclosed works as follows: in the case where an optional component cannot be started, create another component with the same interface characteristics as the optional component that accepts operations but does nothing with the inputs. Provide this "empty" component in place of the optional component that could not be started. The required components do not need to know that the "empty" component in place of the optional component is actually doing nothing. From the perspective of the required components, the optional component is operating normally. If at a later time the optional component is able to be started, the actual optional component can be provide...