Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic setting of language according to context

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126149D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jul-04
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jul-04
Document File: 1 page(s) / 44K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

In many situations it is desirable to be able to type in two languages, for example within a document, in a search bar, or in e-mails. Presented here is a solution for changing the language automatically.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 87% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Automatic setting of language according to context

In many situations it is desirable to be able to type in two languages, for example within a document, in a search bar, or in e-mails -- any place in which information is typed. The standard solution requires changing the language using either the language bar or a key combination (eg. alt shift)

    According to the proposed solution, the language chosen will change automatically when the typed information makes sense in another language and not in the one currently selected. Once it is has been decided to change to another language, the change starts from the point at which the change is directed to start, not from the location at which the decision was made. So, for example, the user could type "xhdkh, uanutk", and at that point it will realize a change is needed and will change what has been typed to "îùå úéìâéñ ". This is especially useful for touch-typists, as they will not have to look at the screen all the time to see that they are in the correct language mode.

    The implementation will be by checking the input and comparing it to dictionaries in various languages and changing language when it makes sense in a different language than the local setting. The user will have overall control: whether this feature is to be activated; at what percentage of detection; what kind of feedback, if any, will indicate a change (probably audible sound); and, of course, which languages the user is likely to use.

    For regular us...