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Autonomous Resource Management Program: Resource Supervision amongst Processes and Hosts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126250D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jul-11
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jul-11
Document File: 5 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Distributed, multi-processing, or parallel running computational tasks often need to share resources; files, global memory, communication ports etc. Optimal resource management is itself an art, and most often than not a good algorithm for resource management is application defined. Irregardless of any algorithm, the physical means of adding resource management to an application is cumbersome; notwithstanding the possibility that multiple differing applications may be in the need of sharing the same resources. This paper introduces a standalone program, the Lock-Management-Program (LMP) that exclusively provides resource management to any other program or process that invokes it. The program resides on a computer deemed the resource manager host and can be called locally or via standard remote program call mechanisms available on most platforms. The main benefit of the LMP is a plug-and-play instrument that provides domain definable resource management to be used also within heterogeneous application environments.

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Autonomous Resource Management Program Autonomous Resource Management ProgramAutonomous Resource Management Program Autonomous Resource Management Program :

::: Resource Supervision amongstResource Supervision amongstResource Supervision amongst

Resource Supervision amongst

Processes and Hosts Processes and HostsProcesses and Hosts Processes and Hosts

1. Background

    Distributed, multi-processing, or parallel running computational tasks often need to share resources; files, global memory, communication ports etc . Optimal resource management is itself an art, and most often than not a good algorithm for resource management is application defined. Irregardless of any algorithm, the physical means of adding resource management to an application is cumbersome; notwithstanding the possibility that multiple differing applications may be in the need of sharing the same resources.

    This paper introduces a standalone program, the Lock -Management-Program (LMP ) that exclusively provides resource management to any other program or process that invokes it. The program resides on a computer deemed the resource manager host and can be called locally or via standard remote program call mechanisms available on most platforms.

    The main benefit of the LMP is a plug-and-play instrument that provides domain definable resource management to be used also within heterogeneous application environments.

2. Detailed description
2.1. Standalone program acts as an intelligent Semaphore

    Although the LMP is a standalone program, it is invoked by other programs to provide resource management by suspending the caller (parent ) when resources are unavailable. Because the LMP is a self-contained independent executable, resource management can be hosted to any number applications that are able to initiate a local or remote program call; including all mainstream programming environments like C++, Java, Perl, most operating system scripting languages, even many off-the-shelf office applications would have the ability invoke the LMP with no programming required. The LMP could also be invoked indirectly over the internet when configured as a cgi-bin or Web-Services destination; for example.

2.2. Resource management rules are encapsulated in the external program

    The LMP is called each time a resource is requested or released. A call to the LMP might also pass other information in that would be of use to any specific algorithm for determining possible inter-relationships between resources and their users in order to select which caller of the LMP is to obtain a resource and be released).

2.3. IPC (Inter-Process Communication) coordinates global shared resources.

    The coordination of resources between processes is accomplished by one of two mechanisms. If the resource management algorithm is based on trivial round-robin - first come first served dispatching, a single shared operating system semaphore could supply the implementation. A resource would be requested via blockin...