Browse Prior Art Database

VOIP Quality of Service prediction and detection

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126277D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jul-12
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jul-12
Document File: 2 page(s) / 41K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The system disclosed herein provides the ability to provide a reasonable assurance that a given Voice Over IP call will be of acceptable quality to participants at time of call establishment.

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VOIP Quality of Service prediction and detection

The system disclosed herein provides the ability to provide a reasonable assurance that a given Voice Over IP call will be of acceptable quality to participants at time of call establishment. This system allows VOIP call quality to be managed such that only calls likely to be of acceptable quality will be established, even when the outbound SIP Proxy for a given SIP User Agent does not have full control over the network that two SIP User Agents may establish a call over.

Existing solutions to managing VOIP call quality are: dedicating bandwidth exclusively for VOIP between two end points.


1.

However this requires that no more calls are established than the reserved bandwidth is capable of handling; prioritising VOIP traffic above other traffic, particularly on congested


2.

networks. However this prioritisation is not widely deployed across the public internet or even across many intranets, and again this requires that no more calls are established then the priortised bandwidth is capable of handling; end users hanging up the phone end in the event that the call quality is

unacceptable.

  This system minimises the likelihood of end user dissatisfaction and can either supplement or replace network resource reservation/prioritisation by using information available at call establishment time to determine whether the call is likely to be of sufficient quality and hence should continue to be established; or whether the call establishment should be terminated prior to completing in order to minimise user frustration during the call itself.

  The end user perception of the quality of a given VOIP call is dependent on the quality of the underlying IP network used to transport the call. Latency, jitter and packet loss all contribute to less than optimal call quality. Should these factors move outsi...