Browse Prior Art Database

Controlled Release via Disassociation of Biocidal Complexes for Cosmetic, Pharmaceutical, Consumer, and Industrial Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126393D
Publication Date: 2005-Jul-14
Document File: 5 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Richard F. Stockel, Ph.D.: INVENTOR [+2]

Related Documents

US20050136024: PATENT [+4]

Abstract

The present technology discloses the utilization of biocidal complexes by slow dissociation on the skin and other human or animal body substrates, e.g., hair, oral (mouth), and other organs. The treatment and protection of skin surfaces requires that compositions be delivered to the skin surface and allowed to remain on the skin surface for as long as possible before such ingredients are absorbed into deeper layers of skin and carried into the blood stream. The same effect would be observed if the complexes were taken orally or injected into the body via various portals, e.g., nose, rectum, etc. The present technology can also be used to deliver these complexes by coating onto surfaces of materials or by incorporation into materials. The syntheses of these bioactive complexes of this technology are only limited by the method of preparation. Specifically, they are prepared by two routes: 1. metathesis reactions 2. acid-base reactions Another aspect of this technology, which enhances the substantivity of these complexes, but reduces its neutral charge, is the ability to form partial charges either positive or negative. For example a poly charged cation or anion is reacted with the opposite charged ion, but not with the same equivalency, therefore leaving a residual charge on the ion that is present in excess.

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 16% of the total text.

Controlled Release via Disassociation of Biocidal Complexes

 for Cosmetic, Pharmaceutical, Consumer, and Industrial Applications

Richard F. Stockel, Ph.D.

AND

Anthony J. Sawyer, President

Colorado Synthetics Inc.

2400 Bitterroot Circle

Lafayette

,

CO

80026

July 14, 2005

The present technology discloses the utilization of biocidal complexes by slow dissociation on the skin and other human or animal body substrates, e.g., hair, oral (mouth), and other organs. The treatment and protection of skin surfaces requires that compositions be delivered to the skin surface and allowed to remain on the skin surface for as long as possible before such ingredients are absorbed into deeper layers of skin and carried into the blood stream.  The same effect would be observed if the complexes were taken orally or injected into the body via various portals, e.g., nose, rectum, etc.

The present technology can also be used to deliver these complexes by coating onto surfaces of materials or by incorporation into materials.

The syntheses of these bioactive complexes of this technology are only limited by the method of preparation.  Specifically , they are prepared by two routes:

 

  1. metathesis reactions
  2. acid-base reactions

Metathesis

Basically any cationic moiety can be reacted with an anionic moiety as long as the reaction product or by-product precipitates or evolves as a volatile substance.  Under these conditions the complex will form in good to excellent yields.

            Example

            Chlorhexidine     +          triclosan            ----------->           Biocidal complex

            gluconate                      sodium salt                  

(Cationic)                      (anionic)                       

The above reaction can take place in an aqueous or aqueous-alcohol solvent(s) system.  In this case the complex is the component that precipitates as the desired product, and sodium gluconate (soluble in water or water-alcohol) remains in solution.

Acid-base reaction

In this scenario, the driving force for a favorable reaction is the transfer of a proton from a Bronsted acid to a Bronsted base.  This implies that the base is sufficiently strong (basicity) to accept a proton from a sufficiently strong acid.

Example

            Chlorhexidine     +          undecylenic acid            ----------->           Biocidal complex

            (free base)        

It can be seen from the above description that this technology is very broad, and that many combinations can be used including azoles, antibiotics, and cationic/anionic biocides  (both monomers and polymers). 

The efficacy of these complexes is dependent on the specific complex being used, on the degree of dissociation in the media in which it is applied, and on the application it is being...