Browse Prior Art Database

Visual input field

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126492D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Jul-21
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jul-21
Document File: 3 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

The method presented herein solves the problem of visual input fields by modifying the HTML input text fields being used by Internet Explorer* and Mozilla**/Netscape*** browsers.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 40% of the total text.

Page 1 of 3

Visual input field

The method presented herein solves the problem of visual input fields by modifying the HTML input text fields being used by Internet Explorer* and Mozilla**/Netscape*** browsers.

    The goal of this modification is to make these fields visual, i.e. to provide the visual mode of data insertion and display. This modification also implements the specific legacy modes of data input (Field reverse, Push mode, Autofieldreverse, Autopush) familiar to traditional host terminal end-users.

    The modification involves using special HTML styles for disable data reordering and implementing event handlers written on Java Script**** to provide proper data insertion and presentation.

    The DHTML is used for implementation on Internet Explorer and DOM for Mozilla/Netscape.

    The advantage of this solution in comparison with that described in point #4 below is that the "round trip" problem is totally avoided. Moreover it makes it possible to avoid time-consuming BiDitext conversions that could soundly hit the performance when exchanging large amounts of data.

1. Among the most common back-end systems being used are various kinds of legacy systems, such as iSeries, zSeries*****, etc.. Direct access to these systems has usually been implemented by terminal emulators.

    With the boost of internet technologies and the emergence of distributed integrated systems intended to provide the technological solutions for large and medium corporate clients, Web browsers have become the most common tool for accessing data stored and maintained by legacy applications and repositories.

2. The main problem from a bi-directional (BiDi) point of view (common for Arabic and Hebrew users) is the discrepancy in the type of data being maintained by legacy applications, on the one hand (visual), and Web browsers run on Windows and Linux****** operating systems (logical), on the other.

    Most legacy systems store and display data visually. Now, with new Web browser GUIs that display data logically and use logical text fields for data input, the problem of correct data exchange arises.

    For example, some data stored and processed on Mainframe VM 3270 may appear as "ABCDEF" (where upper case stands for Arabic/Hebrew), whereas if this data is obtained from there and displayed in HTML entry field without any processing, it will be shown as "FEDCBA" and therefore will be unreadable. Also data inserted in HTML's input field and sent to the 3270 screen without special processing will get 3270 having incorrect representation.

    The goal of the "visual field" method was to implement visual data processing and presentation in entry fields of HTML documents displayed by Web browsers.

3. Corporate users, who have been accustomed for a long time to dealing with legacy applications using host terminal emulators in order to be able to insert and visualize data flowing from right to left, have been supported with special modes of work (functions) such as Field reverse, Push mode, Autofi...