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FUNCTIONAL PART FOR A PROTECTIVE PURPOSE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126822D
Publication Date: 2005-Aug-12
Document File: 1 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Using the Radio Frequency shield as a tamper resistant cover when attached in a manner that prevents removal When purchasing IT products that contain security functions, United States government agencies may only buy products that have been validated to FIPS 140-2, Security Requirements for Cryptographic Modules. Individual agencies may require that the products meet a particular Security Level of the possible four consecutive Security Levels in FIPS 140-2 that increase in security requirements. At Security Level 3, there are physical security requirements placed on the IT products with the intent of detecting and preventing attempts to physically access the security-relevant hardware. One possible solution to satisfy these physical security requirements on a handheld communication device is to use the existing Radio Frequency (RF) shield as physical protection to the underlying integrated circuits. The current method of attaching the RF to the circuit board uses regular screws and allows for easy removal of the shield. The attachment method would have to be modified so that physical access is detected and/or prevented. By using one-way screws (which can be tightened but not loosened), the RF shield can be attached to the circuit board so that it is not removable without leaving evidence of tampering. This approach is cost effective because the only change made to the existing hardware is the replacement of three to five normal screws with one-way screws. It also has very little impact on the manufacturing process, since at most a new screwdriver bit is needed to install the one-way screws.

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FUNCTIONAL PART FOR A PROTECTIVE PURPOSE

Using the Radio Frequency shield as a tamper resistant cover when attached in a manner that prevents removal

Disclosed Anonymously

When purchasing IT products that contain security functions, United States government agencies may only buy products that have been validated to FIPS 140-2, Security Requirements for Cryptographic Modules.  Individual agencies may require that the products meet a particular Security Level of the possible four consecutive Security Levels in FIPS 140-2 that increase in security requirements.  At Security Level 3, there are physical security requirements placed on the IT products with the intent of detecting and preventing attempts to physically access the security-relevant hardware.

One possible solution to satisfy these physical security requirements on a handheld communication device is to use the existing Radio Frequency (RF) shield as physical protection to the underlying integrated circuits.  The current method of attaching the RF to the circuit board uses regular screws and allows for easy removal of the shield.  The attachment method would have to be modified so that physical access is detected and/or prevented. 

By using one-way screws (which can be tightened but not loosened), the RF shield can be attached to the circuit board so that it is not removable without leaving evidence of tampering.  This approach is cost effective because the only change made to the existing hardware is the replacem...