Browse Prior Art Database

Optimization Machine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126943D
Publication Date: 2005-Aug-15
Document File: 1 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The optimization machine is a software or computer algorithm implemented on the control unit of screening reactors for catalytic performance testing that automatically (i.e. by an optimization algorithm like Simplex algorithm etc) varies reaction conditions (such as temperature, pressure, contact time, space velocity, feed concentrations, etc.) to search for the optimum yield/conversion/selectivity in a predefined parameter space (i.e. which parameters are kept fixed and which are to be varied).

This text was extracted from a Microsoft Word document.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 55% of the total text.

Optimization machine

The optimization machine is a software or computer algorithm implemented on the control unit of screening reactors for catalytic performance testing that automatically (i.e. by an optimization algorithm like Simplex algorithm etc) varies reaction conditions (such as temperature, pressure, contact time, space velocity, feed concentrations, etc.) to search for the optimum yield/conversion/selectivity in a predefined parameter space (i.e. which parameters are kept fixed and which are to be varied)

Currently, this job is conducted by hand, i.e. get the results, decide where to go and manually adjust the next set of parameters. This is the next developmental step for test units for catalytic screening.

The principle is described in an article by Stephen C. Stinson,

June 21, 1999

C&EN, p. 45, where it says “In maybe 10 years, I see an ‘optimization machine’. It will vary time, temperature, and conditions overnight and tell you where you should go from there. The individual components for such a machine are there, but they’re not put together.”

An example of the invention is the direct oxidation of benzene to phenol. We have found that the catalytic performance for the currently best catalyst systems strongly depends on reaction conditions, in particular contact time, space velocity and oxygen feed concentration (more precise: benzene/oxygen ratio) at a given temperature. We found the optimum by intuitively changing the parameters one at a time.

For e...