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Method and Apparatus for Testing Multiple Materials for Adhesive Properties

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126951D
Publication Date: 2005-Aug-15
Document File: 1 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Multiple compositions of matter are tested for adhesive and related properties in a rapid serial, high throughput fashion, by building the sample deposition and testing system around a moving tape, i.e. in an "assembly line" fashion. A spool of clean/new tape is at one end, and is unrolled step wise and/or continuously during the process. The tape passes by a series of stations which perform functions such as depositing the sample in liquid form; spreading the liquid to form a uniform film; drying the film; measuring the film thickness, e.g. optically or with a stylus or probe; and performing tests such as tack, shear, peel, and bending stiffness (modulus). The tape may be rolled up at the end, saving the "library" in a linear/rolled format for future examination. Throughput is limited by whichever step is slowest.

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Method and Apparatus for Testing Multiple Materials for Adhesive Properties

Multiple compositions of matter are tested for adhesive and related properties in a rapid serial, high throughput fashion, by building the sample deposition and testing system around a moving tape, i.e. in an “assembly line” fashion. A spool of clean/new tape is at one end, and is unrolled step wise and/or continuously during the process. The tape passes by a series of stations which perform functions such as depositing the sample in liquid form; spreading the liquid to form a uniform film; drying the film; measuring the film thickness, e.g. optically or with a stylus or probe; and performing tests such as tack, shear, peel, and bending stiffness (modulus). The tape may be rolled up at the end, saving the “library” in a linear/rolled format for future examination. Throughput is limited by whichever step is slowest.

Standard testing methods usually involve testing one material at a time, with a lot of manual labor. Even when moving tapes are used in testing, this is more often for the purpose of evaluating uniformity of the adhesive quality along a manufactured roll. There is no easy way with standard techniques to automatically test hundreds of samples.

Current work on parallel adhesion/mechanical/rheological properties testing is focusing on static array formats, wherein multiple samples are deposited in a rectangular array, and subsequently tested with an array of probes (although serial te...