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A Novel Strategy for Integration of Intensity of Targets in Three-Dimensional Images

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126953D
Publication Date: 2005-Aug-15
Document File: 2 page(s) / 144K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Quantitative and qualitative analysis of image signals is very important in many areas of chemical and physical analysis, especially in high throughput screening for new chemical compounds and drugs. However, it is very difficult to extract the significant portion of the target signals from a background signal that may vary non-uniformly across the image surface. Hence, this task of image analysis is often done via human visual inspection. Due to the subjective nature of visual interpretation, it is often error prone and non-standardized, hence true quantification of scientific data is not achieved. This invention reveals a novel, efficient, and consistent way to quantitatively extract target signals from images in an automated fashion.

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A Novel Strategy for Integration of Intensity of Targets in

Three-Dimensional Images

      Quantitative and qualitative analysis of image signals is very important in many areas of chemical and physical analysis, especially in high throughput screening for new chemical compounds and drugs. However, it is very difficult to extract the significant portion of the target signals from a background signal that may vary non-uniformly across the image surface. Hence, this task of image analysis is often done via human visual inspection. Due to the subjective nature of visual interpretation, it is often error prone and non-standardized, hence true quantification of scientific data is not achieved. This invention reveals a novel, efficient, and consistent way to quantitatively extract target signals from images in an automated fashion.

This method is based on an assumption that any surface can be considered as an integration of uniform “dots” (smaller surfaces). In this method, the three-dimensional data of the target and its adjacent area will be converted into a two-dimensional data by a sum of the intensity in one direction. And then the total intensity of the target can be obtained by an integration of the peak on a two-dimensional curve. This method can be used for targets that are randomly or regularly distributed on a surface. A computer software program based on this method can be easily used for data analysis for the images of the normal TLC, Gel Electrophoresis, and...