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Method for financially motivated polling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000126982D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Aug-16
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Aug-16
Document File: 1 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Polling is used to obtain a consensus opinion. The problem is that individuals when polled do not always provide an answer that they truly believe to be correct. The solution to the problem is to give the individuals a financial interest in the poll.

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Method for financially motivated polling

Polling is used to obtain a consensus opinion from a sampling of a group of people. The problem is that individuals when polled do not always provide an answer that they truly believe to be correct. People may not give a correct answer for many reasons: they wish to please the poll taker; they express prejudices rather than a realistic view; or they cannot be bothered to spend the time to arrive at their best response.

The solution to the problem for poll taking is to give the individuals being polled a financial interest in the poll. For example, if an elected official wants to know the public opinion on a policy issue, individuals may be rewarded based upon their input and the outcome of the poll. Rewards may be offered. The rewards may be given to an individual if that individual's opinion is adopted as public policy; if the policy advocated by the individual is successful.

An example in a microcosm is the audience lifeline poll used on the "Who wants to be a millionaire?" TV show. In this show, the studio audience is asked to advise the contestant on which is the correct choice of four possible answers to a question. The audience now receives no compensation for a correct vote. In our example, individuals in the audience receive a reward to participate in the poll. Those who choose the correct answer receive a reward. Participation need not be limited to the studio audience; it may be extended to others by using the In...