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The Use of Fluorescent Polystyrene Submicron Microspheres to Determine Particulate Contamination and Cleaning Efficiency in Magnetic Storage Disk Drive and Its Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000127366D
Publication Date: 2005-Aug-25
Document File: 1 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention discloses the use of submicron fluorescent microspheres to simulate particulate contamination in the disk drive and its components such as sliders. With the use of an epifluorescence microscope, the submicron fluorescent microspheres are readily visible even using low magnification (eg. 100x). This technique can reveal contamination sites such as the laser-scribed serial numbers on sliders and can be used to determine cleaning efficiencies of various cleaning methods and parameters.

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  The Use of Fluorescent Polystyrene Submicron Microspheres to Determine Particulate Contamination and Cleaning Efficiency in Magnetic Storage Disk Drive and Its Components

  The present invention discloses a method to use fluorescent microspheres to reveal contamination sites and to evaluate or optimize the cleaning efficiencies of new or current cleaning processes. The goal is to achieve contamination free products and optimal cleaning conditions in disk drive components. Commercially available submicron (0.1um to 0.9um) fluorescence labeled polystyrene microspheres are applied to a study sample either by dipping into a diluted aqueous suspension or by spraying using an atomizer. The amount of microspheres and the distribution of the microspheres on the surface can be easily determined with the use of an epifluorescence microscope at 100x or higher magnification. Even microspheres down to 0.5um can be individually resolved in low density areas with magnification as low as 100x. The distribution of the microspheres and preferential adhesion sites can be seen readily with this technique. This kind of samples can then be used for cleaning studies (eg. cleaning the laser-scribed serial numbers on sliders) and to determine the optimal cleaning conditions. Another use of this technique is to determine how a particular process can contaminate surfaces. For example, the fluorescent microspheres can be added to lapping slurries. After lapping, the rows are dried and observe...