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Continuous Two Sheet Compiling in a High Speed Finisher

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000127561D
Publication Date: 2005-Sep-01
Document File: 1 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

At high copy rates (greater than 90 prints per minute or ppm) it becomes difficult to compile and tamp single sheets without the lead edge of the next incoming sheet hitting the tampers causing damage and mis-registration.

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Continuous Two Sheet Compiling in a High Speed Finisher

At high copy rates (greater than 90 prints per minute or ppm) it becomes difficult to compile and tamp single sheets without the lead edge of the next incoming sheet hitting the tampers causing damage and mis-registration.

The invention is an algorithm that uses a buffer module to hold every other sheet until the trailing sheet overtakes it and then feeds both sheets into the compiler module together with the top sheet leading the bottom one.  This process occurs continuously throughout the set doubling the time available for settling.

The invention involves the use of existing 2 sheet buffer technology throughout the compilation of an entire set.  Currently, the first two sheets of the set are buffered to allow sufficient time for the previous set to be stapled and ejected.  With the current machine behavior, the speed (ppm) is limited by the incoming sheet hitting the tampers while they tamp the previously compiled sheet.  This is because above a certain copy rate (approximately 100 ppm) there is not enough time to tamp and then back the tampers out of the way before the next sheet’s lead edge gets there.  This new behavior increases the time between sheets allowing the registration and tamping of each buffered set prior to the next set’s arrival in the compiler.  This process could also be used with 3 sheet buffered sets if required for even faster processing speeds.