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Cooled Former Coil Winding

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000127621D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Oct-10
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Oct-10
Document File: 1 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

A noted problem of winding superconducting coils onto structures of a material with a higher thermal expansion than that of the wire (e.g. NbTi wire onto an Al-alloy former) is that at the working temperature of the coil (typically 4 KELVIN -269 °C), the coil supporting structure has contracted more than the coil. Therefore the coil is no longer held in the geometric position at which it was wound. This effect can lead to coil movement in operation, which can be detrimental to an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) System's performance. The current solutions to this problem are to support the coil via numerous coil clamps or an overband fastened to the coil supporting structure. These current solutions are both costly to manufacture per magnet and labour intensive to fit. A new method to overcome the problem described is to precool the coil supporting structure to as near to the working temperature as is possible, prior to winding room temperature wire onto it. By doing this the wire will be wound onto the structure at the dimensions that the structure will be in operation, therefore ensuring that the coil's geometric position is maintained.

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Cooled Former Coil Winding

Idea: Matthew Hobbs, GB-Oxford

A noted problem of winding superconducting coils onto structures of a material with a higher thermal expansion than that of the wire (e.g. NbTi wire onto an Al-alloy former) is that at the working temperature of the coil (typically 4 KELVIN -269 °C), the coil supporting structure has contracted more than the coil. Therefore the coil is no longer held in the geometric position at which it was wound. This effect can lead to coil movement in operation, which can be detrimental to an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) System's performance.

The current solutions to this problem are to support the coil via numerous coil clamps or an overband fastened to the coil supporting structure. These current solutions are both costly to manufacture per magnet and labour intensive to fit.

A new method to overcome the problem described is to precool the coil supporting structure to as near to the working temperature as is possible, prior to winding room temperature wire onto it. By doing this the wire will be wound onto the structure at the dimensions that the structure will be in operation, therefore ensuring that the coil's geometric position is maintained.

To ensure the best results from this method the wire would have to be wound as fast as is possible to ensure that it too was not cooled by the supporting structure. This could be achieved by winding onto a highly insulative layer between the wire and the structure (Fig....