Browse Prior Art Database

REAL ADDRESS SIP LOCATION AGENT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000127648D
Original Publication Date: 2005-Sep-07
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-07
Document File: 5 page(s) / 490K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

EDGARDO PROMENZIO: INVENTOR [+4]

Abstract

One of the most common challenges in today's communication systems is the ability to keep track of the physical location of mobile devices as they move across different geographical sites of a network. It is complex for the network servers to have this updated "real" location information available at the time they need to contact the clients. For instance, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a protocol that allows User Agents to learn the "nominal" address of other User Agents in a very simple way. Calls are then smoothly routed to their intended destinations. However, when the physical address is needed in order to make some decisions (such as call admission control on bandwidth-constrained links), this information is not always readily available. Information concerning the location of a User Agent that is mobile can be obtained at a certain cost (either by increasing the setup time of a call or by alerting the called party at times when this might not be necessary based on its real location). This article presents a centralized architectural approach to provide the real location information through the introduction of a network element called the Real Address SIP Location Agent (RASLA). This approach avoids the mentioned drawbacks providing a location information repository which use can be extended to multiple applications, as for instance the management of call admission control.

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MOTOROLA TECHNICAL DEVELOPMENTS

INFORMATION SHEET

FOR DEFENSIVE PUBLICATION

Date:                       26 May, 2005

Title:                       REAL ADDRESS SIP LOCATION AGENT

Docket No.:           CE14676R (32189)

Author #1

Name:                     EDGARDO PROMENZIO

Author #2

Name:                     KAMALA URS

Author #3

Name:                     AJAYKUMAR IDNANI

Author #4

Name:                     STEVEN UPP

 


REAL ADDRESS SIP LOCATION AGENT

By Edgardo Promenzio, Kamala Urs, Ajaykumar Idnani, Steve Upp

Motorola, Inc.

Networks Business

 

ABSTRACT

One of the most common challenges in today’s communication systems is the ability to keep track of the physical location of mobile devices as they move across different geographical sites of a network. It is complex for the network servers to have this updated "real" location information available at the time they need to contact the clients. For instance, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) is a protocol that allows User Agents to learn the "nominal" address of other User Agents in a very simple way. Calls are then smoothly routed to their intended destinations. However, when the physical address is needed in order to make some decisions (such as call admission control on bandwidth-constrained links), this information is not always readily available. Information concerning the location of a User Agent that is mobile can be obtained at a certain cost (either by increasing the setup time of a call or by alerting the called party at times when this might not be necessary based on its real location). This article presents a centralized architectural approach to provide the real location information through the introduction of a network element called the Real Address SIP Location Agent (RASLA). This approach avoids the mentioned drawbacks providing a location information repository which use can be extended to multiple applications, as for instance the management of call admission control.

PROBLEM

Many practical applications rely on the knowledge of the physical location of the mobile subscriber in order to optimize the overall functioning of the system. For instance in systems using SIP protocol, call processing can function properly without this knowledge. However, if the system needs to perform some type of call admission control mechanism in order to prevent the over-subscription of bandwidth-constrained data links, the system needs to know ahead of time the location of both the calling and target subscribers. In SIP, the location of the calling device can be sent to the system infrastructure (i.e the B2BUA) embedded into the original INVITE. However, the real location of the target device is not known at the time of the call setup. SIP will eventually manage to determine the nominal location of the target subscriber routing the call properly to its intended destinatio...