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GSA GDS Coin Hopper Communication Protcol v1.0.1

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000127705D
Publication Date: 2005-Sep-10

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Support for dozens of proprietary gaming industry protocols are commonly required to allow various types of gaming systems and equipment to function properly and communicate with each other. Communication between electronic gaming machines (EGMs) and peripheral devices such as the coin hopper, or between the EGM and casino systems can be extraordinarily difficult, and in many cases, impossible. With the many possible combinations of systems and equipment, much of the cost and resources in development, production, and implementation is diverted from actual game content and expended on complex solutions to incompatibility issues. Within the Gaming Standards Association (GSA), the Gaming Device Standards committee has developed several USB-based standards for hot plug and play peripheral devices, including the one described here, for coin hoppers. GDS coin hoppers are implemented as Human Interface Device (HID) class devices, in the same class as mice, keyboards, and joysticks, removing the need for special manufacturer-specific device drivers. The GDS Coin Hopper Communication Protocol enables communication between coin hoppers and EGMs, as well as the monitoring and management of the coin hoppers. The protocol includes reports for device enable/disable, self-test, CRC (cyclic redundancy check) calculation, game authentication, and paying out coins. The protocol also provides for communication of power status, number of coins paid, and coin hopper statuses, such as for firmware, non-volatile memory, and mechanical. Through USB features, device hardware and firmware information, such as manufacturer, product identification, and versioning can also be determined. Widespread implementation of the GDS protocols will reduce costs for developers and manufacturers, allowing competition and resources to focus on innovation and efficiency in products and processes; and operators will be able to make choices based on features, reliability, and serviceability rather than compatibility. GSA GDS protocols address EGM-to-peripheral communications. Other GSA protocols address EGM-to-host and system-to-system communications. All GSA standards are open, founded on existing industry standards and technologies, and developed to support each other. GDS protocols can be implemented alone or with other GSA open protocols for complete integrated solutions. Development of the open GDS Coin Hopper Communication Protocol is a collaborative effort by and for the gaming industry, with the involvement of worldwide GSA member gaming manufacturers, suppliers, operators, and regulators.

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39355 California Street ~ Suite 307 ~ Fremont, CA 94538

ABSTRACT

    GSA GDS Coin Hopper Communication Protocol v1.0.1

Support for dozens of proprietary gaming industry protocols are commonly required to allow various types of gaming systems and equipment to function properly and communicate with each other. Communication between electronic gaming machines (EGMs) and peripheral devices such as the coin hopper, or between the EGM and casino systems can be extraordinarily difficult, and in many cases, impossible. With the many possible combinations of systems and equipment, much of the cost and resources in development, production, and implementation is diverted from actual game content and expended on complex solutions to incompatibility issues.

Within the Gaming Standards Association (GSA), the Gaming Device Standards committee has developed several USB-based standards for hot plug and play peripheral devices, including the one described here, for coin hoppers. GDS coin hoppers are implemented as Human Interface Device (HID) class devices, in the same class as mice, keyboards, and joysticks, removing the need for special manufacturer-specific device drivers.

The GDS Coin Hopper Communication Protocol enables communication between coin hoppers and EGMs, as well as the monitoring and management of the coin hoppers. The protocol includes reports for device enable/disable, self-test, CRC (cyclic redundancy check) calculation, game authentication, and paying out coins. The protocol also provides for communication of power status, number of coins paid, and coin hopper statuses, such as for firmware, non-volatile memory, and mechanical. Through USB features, device hardware and firmware information, such as manufacturer, product identification, and versioning can also be determined.

Widespread implementation of the GDS protocols will reduce costs for developers and manufacturers, allowing competition and resources to focus on innovation and efficiency in products and processes; and operators will be able to make choices based on features, reliability, and serviceability rather than compatibility. GSA GDS protocols address EGM-to- peripheral communications. Other GSA protocols address EGM-to-host and system-to- system communications. All GSA standards are open, founded on existing industry standards and technologies, and developed to support each other. GDS protocols can be implemented alone or with other GSA open protocols for complete integrated solutions. Development of the open GDS Coin Hopper Communication Protocol is a collaborative effort by and for the gaming industry, with the involvement of worldwide GSA member gaming manufacturers, suppliers, operators, and regulators.

September 2, 2005 © 2005 Gaming Standards Association (GSA) http://www.gamingstandards.com

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GDS Coin Hopper:

Communication Protocol DRAFT v1.0.1

(Includes Errata Sheets 1 and 2)

Implemented as USB H...