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FILTERING HIGH QUALITY TEXT FOR DISPLAY ON RASTER SCAN DEVICES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000127914D
Original Publication Date: 1981-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 13 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

J. Kajiya: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The computer age nearly destroyed quality printed and displayed text. Many of us rememher our first sight of the ugly, uneven impression of a high speed chain printer. A1: the time, it seemed inevitable that high technology would sweep more beautiful--ind les: utilitarian--methods of text display aside for all but the most premium of uses. Recently this prospect has changed. With the growing availability of raster scan displays we have witnessed a technology with the capability. of generating alphanumeric text that is more than just readable but pleasant to view as well.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

FILTERING HIGH QUALITY TEXT FOR DISPLAY ON RASTER SCAN DEVICES

J. Kajiya and M. Ullner California Institute of Technology Pasadena, CA TM# 5018

(Published in Computer Graphics, Volume 15, Number 3, August 1981) Computer Graphics Volume 15, Number 3 August 1981 FILTERING HIGH QUALITY TEXT FOR DISPLAY ON RASTER SCAN DEVICES

by J. Kajiya and M. Ullner Computer Science Department California Institute of Technology Abstract. Recently several investigators have studied the problem of displaying text characters on grey level raster scan displays. Despite arguments suqgestind that grey level displays are equivalent to very high resolution bitmaps, the performance of gray level displays has been disappointing. This paper will show that much of the problem can be traced to inappropriate antiaiiasing procedures. Instead of tile classical (sin x)Jx filter, the situation calls for a filter with characteristics matched both to the nature of display on CRTs and to the human visual system. We give examples to illustrate the problems of the existing methods and the advantages of the new methods. Although the techniques are described in terms of tent, the results have application to the general antialiasing problem--at least in theory if not in practice.

1. INTRODUCTION

The computer age nearly destroyed quality printed and displayed text. Many of us rememher our first sight of the ugly, uneven impression of a high speed chain printer. A1: the time, it seemed inevitable that high technology would sweep more beautiful--ind les: utilitarian-- methods of text display aside for all but the most premium of uses. Recently this prospect has changed. With the growing availability of raster scan displays we have witnessed a technology with the capability. of generating alphanumeric text that is more than just readable but pleasant to view as well.

It is an exciting dream of men like Donald Knuth to be able to compose locally and transmit for publication high quality text containing multiple fonts and mathematical equations. This dream would be made more attractive if an author would be able to see the' result immediately, rather than having to wait several clays for the output of a $100,000 machine. The ideal would be to close the loop: to make available to the author an inexpensive real time device able to display high performance images. Permission to copy without fee all or part of this material is granted provided that the copies are not made or distributed for direct commercial advantage, the ACM copyright notice and the title of the publication and its date appear, and notice is given that copying is by permission of the Association for Computing Machinery. To copy otherwise, or to republish, requires a fee and/or specific permission. 1981 ACM0-8971-045-1/81-0800-0007 $00.75 Furthermore, the effect of high quality real time displays on the activities of computer science itseiT has yet to...