Browse Prior Art Database

ASK is Transportable in Half a Dozen Ways

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000127949D
Original Publication Date: 1986-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 15 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Bozena H. Thompson: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This paper is an informal discussion of the technical issues and solutions encountered in making the ASK System transportable. A natural language system can be "transportable" in a number of ways. Although transportability to a new domain is most prominent, other ways are also important if the system is to have viability in the commercial marketplace. "To transport" is a subcase of "to extend." To transport a system to a new domain is tantamount to starting with the system prior to adding any doma knowledge and extending it to incorporate the new domain. One may wish to add to a system that already has knowledge of one domain, the knowledge concernin a second domain, i.e.. e:,~tend the system to cover this second domain. In the ' context of ASK, it has been natural to implement "extend", then achieve transportability as a special case. We consider six ways in which the ASK System can be e:;tended to include new capabilities: o to a new domain to a new object type o to access data from a foreign data base o to a new natural language o to a new programming language a to a new computer family

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 7% of the total text.

Page 1 of 15

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

ASK is Transportable in Half a Dozen Ways

Bozena H. Thompson and Frederick B. Thompson

5214:TR:86 ACM, Transactions on Office Information Systems April ASK IS TRANSPORTABLE IN HALF A DOZEN WAYS

Bozena Henisz Thompson Frederick H. Thompson

California Institute of Technology Pasadena, California 91125

Abstract

This paper is an informal discussion of the technical issues and solutions encountered in making the ASK System transportable. A natural language system can be "transportable" in a number of ways. Although transportability to a new domain is most prominent, other ways are also important if the system is to have viability in the commercial marketplace.

"To transport" is a subcase of "to extend." To transport a system to a new domain is tantamount to starting with the system prior to adding any doma knowledge and extending it to incorporate the new domain. One may wish to add to a system that already has knowledge of one domain, the knowledge concernin a second domain, i.e.. e:,~tend the system to cover this second domain. In the ' context of ASK, it has been natural to implement "extend", then achieve transportability as a special case.

We consider six ways in which the ASK System can be e:;tended to include new capabilities:

o to a new domain to a new object type o to access data from a foreign data base o to a new natural language o to a new programming language a to a new computer family

I. What is ASK?

ASN::, A Simple Knowledgeable System, is a total system for structuring, manipulation and communication of information. The primary ASK user interface is a simple dialect of English. ASK includes its own semantic net data base management system as well as many other capabilities for enhancing the user": ability to deal effectivly with his knowledge base. Although a number of papers have been published about ASE:: Cl,y,.''7, we will start this paper,

y page whose principal topic is transportability of ASF~::, with a short series of examples of some of its English capabilities.

Here are some simple queries:

:. What i s the cargo of the Tokyo Maru? wheat ::)How many tankers are there? ._, ::List the home port and destination of each tanker. tanker home port destination British Star London

California Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1986

Page 2 of 15

ASK is Transportable in Half a Dozen Ways

Naples Christina Piraeus London :::What ships are longer than 450 feet? British Star Tokyo Maru

More complex queries illustrate such constructuians as relative clauses, negation and con.lunction:

>What cities are the home parts of ships whose destination is London? Piraeus New York >Are there any ships that do not have a cargo? yes :What ships whose cargo is wheat have London or Oslo as destination? ships whose cargo is wheat London Alamo Oslo Karlaren

Ambiguity is handled in a straightforward way:

>What is the number of New York: ships? There are answers: (1) New York: (d...