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Some principles of somatosensory cortical organization in rats and humans

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128028D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 6 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Moore, Christopher I.: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-220: URL

Abstract

This thesis research elucidated principles of somatosensory cortical organization at the level of the receptive field, cortical map, and cortical area in the rat and human. Throughout these studies, a central focus was on the connection between each level of organization and the capacity for cortical reorganization. The rat and human somatosensory systems each bring unique opportunities to the study of somatosensory function. Rat SI provides a well-researched system in which detailed, invasive studies can be conducted. Human SI, while less readily available to detailed analysis, is ultimately the relevant preparation for studying the relation between cortical map organization and human perception.

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Some Principles of Somatosensory Cortical Organization in Rats and Humans

by

Christopher I. 'Moore
B.A., Neuroscience and Philosophy Oberlin College, 1990 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology April 1998 [June 1998]

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences

April 30, 1998

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Suzanne Corkin, Ph. D.

Professor of Behavioral Neuroscience

ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Mriganka Sur, Ph. D.

Teuber Professor and Chairman, Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES SEP 02 1998

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1998

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Some principles of somatosensory cortical organization in rats and humans

Some Principles of Somatosensory Cortical Organization in Rats and Humans

by

Christopher I. Moore

Submitted to the Department of Brain and Cognitive Sciences in April 1998 in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Brain and Cognitive Sciences

ABSTRACT

This thesis research elucidated principles of somatosensory cortical organization at the level of the receptive field, cortical map, and cortical area in the rat and human. Throughout these studies, a central focus was on the connection between each level of organization and the capacity for cortical reorganization. The rat and human somatosensory systems each bring unique opportunities to the study of somatosensory function. Rat SI provides a well-researched system in which detailed, invasive studies can be conducted. Human SI, while less readily available to detailed analysis, is ultimately the relevant preparation for studying the relation between cortical map organization and human perception.

In Chapter 1, I examined the convergence of subthreshold ( nonaction potential evoking) sensory input in individual neure-ns using whole-cell in vivo recording techniques. Individual neurons in rat SI integrated subthreshold information from an extensive peripheral field, spanning on average 2 vibrissae in each direction from the vibrissa that evoked the largest input (the primary vibrissa). Inputs across the subthreshold receptive field were not homogeneous, as the latency to onset, rise time and prevalence of inhibition varied as a function of the strength of excitatory input and the time poststimulus when they are assessed. These spatial and temporal variables constrain the suprathreshold output of the receptive field, and define the substrate for context-dependent integration of input.

In Chapter 2, I described studies of the rat SI vibrissa represen...