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Low volume manufacturing strategies for the automotive industry : a global and emerging economy perspective

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128031D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 7 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

German, Luis David: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-214: URL

Abstract

Low volume manufacturing has become increasingly important for the automotive industry. Globalization trends have led automakers and their suppliers to operate in developing regions of the world were economies of scale can not always be achieved, Niche markets for the performance/sport cars and some luxury sedans have been gaining economic importance, further fueling the need for developing more economic efficient low volume manufacturing operations. While low volume manufacturing has been the subject of much research, this has largely focused on flow optimization, inventory reduction and logistics improvements. Less attention has been paid to the subject of process technology choices, Identifying and employing optimal processing technology for low volume applications can reduce costs significantly.

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-214 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

Low Volume Manufacturing Strategies for the Automotive Industry: A Global and Emerging Economy Perspective

by

Luis David German
Licenciado en Ciencias Fisicas Universidad de Buenos Aires, 1992

S. M. Materials Science and Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1996 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in MATERIALS ENGINEERING

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

JUNE 1998
SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Materials Science and Engineering

May 1, 1998

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Joel P. Clark Professor of Materials Engineering Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Linn W. Hobbs John F. Elliott Professor of Materials Chairman, Departmental Committee on Graduate Students

ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES OCT 06 1998

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1998

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Low volume manufacturing strategies for the automotive industry : a global and emerging economy perspective

Low Volume Manufacturing Strategies for the Automotive Industry: A Global and Emerging Economy Perspective

by

Luis David German

Submitted to the Department of Materials Science and Engineering on May 1, 1998 in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements of the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Materials Engineering

ABSTRACT

Low volume manufacturing has become increasingly important for the automotive industry. Globalization trends have led automakers and their suppliers to operate in developing regions of the world were economies of scale can not always be achieved, Niche markets for the performance/sport cars and some luxury sedans have been gaining economic importance, further fueling the need for developing more economic efficient low volume manufacturing operations. While low volume manufacturing has been the subject of much research, this has largely focused on flow optimization, inventory reduction and logistics improvements. Less attention has been paid to the subject of process technology choices, Identifying and employing optimal processing technology for low volume applications can reduce costs significantly.

This thesis presents technical cost modeling as an effective methodology for examining low volume manufacturing cases and identifies typical areas of concern for low volume producers. General strategies for reducing the cost penalties associated with low volume production are also presented. Four cases are analyzed; Argentine engine valve manufacturing, Thai steering wheel manufacturing, automobile radiator manufacturing, and sheet metal stamping. These cases exemplify three of the most common issues affecting low volume manufacturing; the...