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Preliminary design of a liquid bipropellant microfabricated rocket engine

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128037D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 6 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Al-Midani, Omar M: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-216: URL

Abstract

This thesis discusses the design of a microfabricated rocket engine. Micro-rockets feature a thrust to weight ratio up to two orders of magnitude greater than conventional rocket motors at small thrust levels and hence are very attractive for satellite propulsion applications and micro-satellite development. All major rocket components have been characterized and evaluated for micro-scale operation. These include a 300 atm pumping system, a 3000 K and 125 atm combustion chamber and a Mach 3.5 thrusting nozzle. Studies indicate that a turbopump system is feasible while further investigations on bearings are required to fully validate the concept. The viability of the combustion chamber is believed to be dependent or. ~he mixing performance of an innovative injection scheme which features inter-digitated fuel/oxidizer jets impinging at a 180 angle. The nozzle is projected to perform satisfactorily, incurring a mere 2% loss in thrust according to 2D CFD calculations. Modeling of the system transients has indicated an acceleration time on the order of 0.1 sec.as well as notable sensitivities to the injector diameter and turbine blade turning angles. The analysis suggests that the micro-rocket engine concept is feasible and identifies the engineering challenges ahead. Thesis Supervisor: Professor Alan H. Epstein Title: R.. C. Maclaurin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics 3

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-216 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A LIQUID BIPROPELLANT MICROFABRICATED ROCKET ENGINE

by

OMAR M. AL-MIDANI
Bachelor of Science in Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles (1996) Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
June 1998


(C) Omar M. Al-Midani. All rights reserved.

The author hereby grants to MIT permission to reproduce and distribute publicly paper and electronic copies of this thesis document in whole or in part, and to grant others the right to do so.

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics June, 1998
CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Professor Alan H. Epstein R.C. Maclauin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Associate Professor Jaime Peraire Chairman, Department Graduate Committee

ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES JUL 08 1998

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1998

Page 2 of 6

Preliminary design of a liquid bipropellant microfabricated rocket engine

PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A LIQUID BIPROPELLANT MICROFABRICATED ROCKET ENGINE

by

OMAR M. AL-MIDANI

ABSTRACT

This thesis discusses the design of a microfabricated rocket engine. Micro-rockets feature a thrust to weight ratio up to two orders of magnitude greater than conventional rocket motors at small thrust levels and hence are very attractive for satellite propulsion applications and micro- satellite development.

All major rocket components have been characterized and evaluated for micro-scale operation. These include a 300 atm pumping system, a 3000 K and 125 atm combustion chamber and a Mach 3.5 thrusting nozzle. Studies indicate that a turbopump system is feasible while further investigations on bearings are required to fully validate the concept. The viability of the combustion chamber is believed to be dependent or. ~he mixing performance of an innovative injection scheme which features inter-digitated fuel/oxidizer jets impinging at a 180 angle. The nozzle is projected to perform satisfactorily, incurring a mere 2% loss in thrust according to 2D CFD calculations. Modeling of the system transients has indicated an acceleration time on the order of 0.1 sec.as well as notable sensitivities to the injector diameter and turbine blade turning angles.

The analysis suggests that the micro-rocket engine concept is feasible and identifies the engineering challenges ahead.

Thesis Supervisor: Professor Alan H. Epstein Title: R.. C. Maclaurin Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

I would like to thank God and my family for giving me the opportunity to attend one o...