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A generalized framework for complex system design and management

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128039D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 5 page(s) / 20K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Adamsen, Paul B: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-229: URL

Abstract

This thesis outlines a structured framework for complex system design and management. There have been and continue to be many efforts focused on defining the elusive generic System Engineering Process. I suggest one reason vvhy industry, government, and academic efforts have had limited success in defining a generalized process applicable to many contexts, is that the time and logical domains have not been explicitly identified and characterized in distinction. When the logical view is combined with the chronological view, the resulting process becomes application specific. When these are characterized in distinction, the overall framework is preserved. This thesis develops a generalized process that maintains this distinction and is thus applicable to many contexts.

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-229 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

A Generalized Framework for Complex System Design and Management

by

Paul B. Adamsen, Jr.

Master of Divinity, The Master's Seminary, Los Angeles (1989) B.S. Mechanical Engineering, California State University, Long Beach (1981)

Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

August 5, 1998 [September 1998]
(C) 1998 Paul B. Adamsen, Jr. All Rights Reserved

The author hereby grants to M.I.T. permission to reproduce and to distribute copies of this thesis document in whole or in part.

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Paul B. Adamsen, Jr.

System Design and Management Program

August 1998

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Steven D. Eppinger Associate Professor of Management Science Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Thomas L. Magnanti Institute Professor Co-director, Operations Research Center Co-director, System Design and Management Program
ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES AUG 20 1998

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1998

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A generalized framework for complex system design and management

A GENERALIZED FRAMEWORK FOR COMPLEX

SYSTEM DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT

By

Paul B. Adamsen, Jr.

Submitted to the System Design and Management Program on August 5, 1998 in. Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management

ABSTRACT

This thesis outlines a structured framework for complex system design and management. There have been and continue to be many efforts focused on defining the elusive generic System Engineering Process. I suggest one reason vvhy industry, government, and academic efforts have had limited success in defining a generalized process applicable to many contexts, is that the time and logical domains have not been explicitly identified and characterized in distinction. When the logical view is combined with the chronological view, the resulting process becomes application specific. When these are characterized in distinction, the overall framework is preserved. This thesis develops a generalized process that maintains this distinction and is thus applicable to many contexts.

The design and management of complex systems involves the execution of technical activities together with managerial activities. Because of the organic connection between these two sets of activities, they must be integrated in order to maximize the potential for success. This integration requires a clear definition of what the system development process is in terms of the technical activities and how they logically interact. The " control logic " thus provided i...