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The design of a lean automobile dismantling and recycling system

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128046D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 3 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Sheppard, Dean A: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-230: URL

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to design a new, more efficient automobile recycling system for the JMS consortium. JMS is a consortium of 18 independent automobile recycling facilities processing a collective annual throughout of over 200,000 vehicles. To begin the design process three JMS facilities were studied to establish the system requirements. Based on the requirements a new system was designed using the principles of lean production. Aspects of the system were tested at the same three locations to validate the design. Based on the test results, the lean system design presented herein is expected to increase effective daily throughput 25%, increase the peak throughput rate by 67%, significantly reduce the handling and therefore damage of each vehicle, and reduce the amount of land allocated to non-value adding buffers by 66%. Furthermore, the lean system is balanced and synchronized to the vehicle-arrival process, with increased volume flexibility. Currently, JMS anticipates implementing the design in all new facilities beginning with the Denver project this month. To address the question of what is the optimal throughput rate for JMS facilities, all known profit-influencing variables were parameterized and an analytical model of the profit was established. Using some simplifying assumptions, the profit-maximizing throughput was obtained. From this, three interesting and intuitive results were obtained: l. if there is a profit to be made per vehicle excluding parts-sales then the profit maximizing throughput quantity is infinitely large,

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-230 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

The Design of a Lean Automobile Dismantling and Recycling System

by Dean Sheppard

Acknowledgements

Projects such as this are never possible without the help of others and so I would like to take this opportunity to recognize the some of the many people who made this possible. First I would like to thank Professor Cochran for his wisdom and guidance throughout this project. He has taught me the value of not only a lean production system, but also that the principles may be applied to any system.

I would like thank my brothers, Gord, Phil, and Mike for providing me with the information necessary to complete this project and helping me understand and characterize the system. Additionally, without Gord's assistance on the tests in Kansas City, St. Louis, and Calgary, none of this would have been possible.

Also for their help with the tests, I would like to thank the following people at the three participating JMS facilities: Martii, Paul, Shane, Pat, Bruce (for help with my thunderbird), Tom the manager in Kansas City (KC), the KC foreman, KC drain-team, St. Louis manager, and the St. Louis drain-team.

I would also like thank my parents, Jack and Glenda, for their love, support and funding over the previous two years.

Finally, 1 would like to thank my wife, Tamara, and sons, Jake and Mason, for allowing me the opportunity to complete this project. They provided the support when needed and the distractions when needed to see the project to the end.

Dean.

Have a nice day.

Acknowledgements

Page 2 of

The Design of a Lean Automobile Dismantling and Recycling System

by Dean Sheppard

Abstract

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1998

Page 2 of 3

The design of a lean automobile dismantling and recycling system

The purpose of this project was to design a new, more efficient automobile recycling system for the JMS consortium. JMS is a consortium of 18 independent automobile recycling facilities processing a collective annual throughout of over 200,000 vehicles.

To begin the design process three JMS facilities were studied to establish the system requirements. Based on the requirements a new system was designed using the principles of lean production. Aspects of the system were tested at the same three locations to validate the design.

Based on the test results, the lean system design presented herein is expected to increase effective daily throughput 25%, increase the peak throughput rate by 67%, significantly reduce the handling and therefore damage of each vehicle, and reduce the amount of land allocated to non-value adding buffers by 66%. Furthermore, the lean system is balanced and synchronized to the vehicle-arrival process, with increased volume flexibility. Currentl...