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The geographic sources of innovation in the multinational enterprise : U.S. subsidiaries and host country spillovers, 1980-1990

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128057D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 8 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Frost, Anthony S: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-247: URL

Abstract

This dissertation is about multinational firms and the geography of technological innovation. It addresses a series of questions about the spatial location of the knowledge sources that underpin and inform innovations developed by foreign subsidiaries. where foreign subsidiaries draw their scientific, technical, and commercial ideas from during the process of generating knowledge is a central concern in current debates about the nature of foreign direct investment and the multinational enterprise. An emerging notion in the literature is that the multinational firm may be evolving toward an institution specializing in the assimilation, diffusion, and, ultimately, creation, of knowledge on a worldwide scale. A key conjecture in this perspective is that what makes the multinational unique as a learning organization is its structural position spanning heterogeneous institutional environments. To date there exists little in the way of systematic evidence that foreign subsidiaries assimilate knowledge originating in the host countries in which they are located - much less that this knowledge is actually being utilized, either locally by the subsidiary or elsewhere within the multinational firm. This study seeks to advance this debate through an empirical investigation of the subsidiary-environment interface in the context of technological innovation. Three research questions are addressed: 1. Where, geographically, do foreign subsidiaries derive their scientific and technical ideas from during the process of technological innovation? 2. Under what conditions do innovations generated by foreign subsidiaries build upon sources of science and technology in the home and/or host country?

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1998-247 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

The Geographic Sources of Innovation in the Multinational Enterprise: U.S. Subsidiaries and Host Country Spillovers, 1980-1990

by

Anthony S. Frost


B.Comm., University of British Columbia, 1987 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
School of Management

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

March 1998 [JUNE 1998]
(C) 1998 Anthony S. Frost All rights reserved.

The author hereby grants to MIT permission to reproduce and to distribute publicly paper and electronic copies of this thesis document in whole or in part.

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]
D. Eleanor Westney

Sloan Fellows Professor of Management Sloan School of Management Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Birger Wernerfelt Chairman, Ph.D Committee Sloan School of Management ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES OCT 21 1998

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1998

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The geographic sources of innovation in the multinational enterprise : U.S. subsidiaries and host country spillovers, 1980-1990

The Geographic Sources of Innovation in the Multinational Enterprise; U.S. Subsidiaries and Host Country Spillovers, 1980-1990

by

Anthony S. Frost

Submitted to the Sloan School of Management on January 3, 1998 in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Abstract

This dissertation is about multinational firms and the geography of technological innovation. It addresses a series of questions about the spatial location of the knowledge sources that underpin and inform innovations developed by foreign subsidiaries.

where foreign subsidiaries draw their scientific, technical, and commercial ideas from during the process of generating knowledge is a central concern in current debates about the nature of foreign direct investment and the multinational enterprise. An emerging notion in the literature is that the multinational firm may be evolving toward an institution specializing in the assimilation, diffusion, and, ultimately, creation, of knowledge on a worldwide scale. A key conjecture in this perspective is that what makes the multinational unique as a learning organization is its structural position spanning heterogeneous institutional environments. To date there exists little in the way of systematic evidence that foreign subsidiaries assimilate knowledge originating in the host countries in which they are located - much less that this knowledge is actually being utilized, either locally by the subsidiary or elsewhere within the multinational firm.

This study seeks to advance this debate through an empirical investigation of the su...