Browse Prior Art Database

Circuit level synthesis for delta-sigma converters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128064D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 5 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Peng, Mark Shane: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-114: URL

Abstract

Analog circuit design is a relatively complicated art that requires a high degree of erudition in the field. With this in mind, this thesis presents work on an analog circuit synthesis tool to minimize analog circuit design time. Specifically, the author has designed and implemented a discrete-time, one-bit, oversampling delta-sigma analog-to-digital modulator circuit synthesis tool in MATLAB script. With the parameters of center frequency, loop order, oversampling ratio, and minimum capacitor size, a user can utilize the program to generate a semi-optimized transistor level description of the modulator that can subsequently be used in SPICE. Parlaying Richard Schreier's work on a delta-sigma toolbox for MATLAB, the switched capacitor circuit contains robustly generated differential operational amplifiers and comparators. Furthermore, switched capacitors are scaled for minimal UI C noise while switch sizes are synchronously adjusted to accommodate these values. Results of the SPICE simulations of the generated circuits compare favorably with the behaviorally predicted results. Thesis Supervisor: Hae-Seung Lee Title: Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 2

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 32% of the total text.

Page 1 of 5

 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-114 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

Circuit Level Synthesis for Delta-Sigma Converters

by

Mark Shane Peng
B.S. Electrical Engineering and Computer Science University of California at Berkeley (1997) Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology January 1999 [February, 1999]

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

January, 1999

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Hae-Seung Lee Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES MAR 05 1999

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

Page 2 of 5

Circuit level synthesis for delta-sigma converters

Circuit Level Synthesis for Delta-Sigma Converters by Mark Shane Peng

Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science on January, 1999, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science

Abstract

Analog circuit design is a relatively complicated art that requires a high degree of erudition in the field. With this in mind, this thesis presents work on an analog circuit synthesis tool to minimize analog circuit design time. Specifically, the author has designed and implemented a discrete- time, one-bit, oversampling delta-sigma analog-to-digital modulator circuit synthesis tool in MATLAB script. With the parameters of center frequency, loop order, oversampling ratio, and minimum capacitor size, a user can utilize the program to generate a semi-optimized transistor level description of the modulator that can subsequently be used in SPICE. Parlaying Richard Schreier's work on a delta-sigma toolbox for MATLAB, the switched capacitor circuit contains robustly generated differential operational amplifiers and comparators. Furthermore, switched capacitors are scaled for minimal UI C noise while switch sizes are synchronously adjusted to accommodate these values. Results of the SPICE simulations of the generated circuits compare favorably with the behaviorally predicted results.

Thesis Supervisor: Hae-Seung Lee Title: Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Acknowledgments

I would first and foremost acknowledge Professor Hae-Seung Lee for his faith in taking me on as a graduate student. He has helped me in countless ways in providing sagacious guidance, timeless wisdom, and trenchant insights. In working with him, I have truly been enriched.

Next, I would like to acknowledge my family. Although far away, thoughts of them pervade my mind everyday. Strength and equanimity...