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System analysis using automatic dependent surveillance broadcast (ADS-B) for closely spaced parallel approaches

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128076D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 6 page(s) / 21K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Solomon, Bruce Allen: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-56: URL

Abstract

The United States National Airspace System (NAS) is undergoing evolutionary changes in response to growing air traffic demands and aging equipment. In 1981 the Federal Aviation Administration initiated a modernization program to modernize, automate, and consolidate the existing ATC system by the year 2000. This effort is ongoing and will continue well into the 21st century. Improving capacity is one goal of the modernization program. Closely spaced parallel approaches are used at many of the busiest airports to increase capacity. During visual flight conditions parallel runways operate independently at maximum capacity. During non-visual meteorological conditions operating procedures are modified to assure safe operations. Capacity reductions of 50% may occur depending on the runway spacing. New communication, navigation, and surveillance technologies are being developed that offer the potential of improved capacity by enabling closely spaced parallel approaches during non-visual conditions.

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Page 1 of 6

 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-56 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

System Analysis Using Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) for Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

by

Bruce A. Solomon
MS, Mechanical Engineering, 1984 BS, Mechanical Engineering, 1982 University of New Hampshire
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

January 1999 [February, 1999]
(c) 1999 Bruce A. Solomon. ~Ail rights reserved.

The author hereby grants to MIT permission to reproduce and to distribute publicly paper and electronic copies of this thesis document in whole or in part.

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

System Design and Management Program

January 15, 1998

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

John-Paul B. Clarke

Charles Stark Draper Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics Thesis Advisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

John R. Williams Director, System Design and Management Program ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES APR 12 1999

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

Page 2 of 6

System analysis using automatic dependent surveillance broadcast (ADS-B) for closely spaced parallel approaches

System Analysis Using Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) for Closely Spaced Parallel Approaches

by

Bruce A. Solomon

MS, Mechanical Engineering, 1984 BS, Mechanical Engineering, 198? University of New Hampshire

Submitted to the System Design and Management Program on January 15, 1999 in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management

ABSTRACT

The United States National Airspace System (NAS) is undergoing evolutionary changes in response to growing air traffic demands and aging equipment. In 1981 the Federal Aviation Administration initiated a modernization program to modernize, automate, and consolidate the existing ATC system by the year 2000. This effort is ongoing and will continue well into the 21st century. Improving capacity is one goal of the modernization program. Closely spaced parallel approaches are used at many of the busiest airports to increase capacity. During visual flight conditions parallel runways operate independently at maximum capacity. During non-visual meteorological conditions operating procedures are modified to assure safe operations. Capacity reductions of 50% may occur depending on the runway spacing. New communication, navigation, and surveillance technologies are being developed that offer the potential of improved capacity by enabling closely spaced parallel approaches during non-visual conditions.

An analysis was conducted starting with the financial cost of delays resulting from...