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Republic of Shade : the emergence of the American elm as a cultural and urban design element in nineteenth-century New England

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128081D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 7 page(s) / 23K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Campanella, Thomas J: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-70: URL

Abstract

This dissertation is a cultural history of the American elm. It explores the transformation of a native tree into a major icon of New England culture in the nineteenth century-both as a multivalanced symbol of New England life, and a defining element in the spatial design of its villages, towns and cities. Drawing from a wide range of source material-traveler's records, local histories, town and municipal records and contemporary newspaper accounts-the study traces the forces and events which made the elm a ubiquitous feature of the Yankee scene, and a core element in the identity and image of the region.

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-70 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

Republic of Shade: The Emergence of the American Elm as a Cultural and Urban Design Element in Nineteenth-Century New England

by

Thomas J. Campanella
MLA, Cornell University (1991) BS, State University of New York (1986) Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Philosophy in Urban and Landscape History

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

February 1999
(c) 1999 Thomas J. Campanella. All rights reserved.

The author hereby grants to MIT permission to reproduce and to distribute publicly paper and electronic copies of this document in whole or in part.

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Thomas J. Campanella 29 January 1999
CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Lawrence J. Vale Associate Professor of Urban Studies and Planning ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Frank Levy

Chair, PhD Committee
ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES JUN 11 1999

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

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Republic of Shade : the emergence of the American elm as a cultural and urban design element in nineteenth-century New England

Republic of Shade: The Emergence of the American Elm as a Cultural and Urban Design Element in Nineteenth-Century New England

by

Thomas J. Campanella

Submitted to the Department of Urban Studies and Planning in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Urban and Landscape History

Abstract

This dissertation is a cultural history of the American elm. It explores the transformation of a native tree into a major icon of New England culture in the nineteenth century-both as a multivalanced symbol of New England life, and a defining element in the spatial design of its villages, towns and cities. Drawing from a wide range of source material-traveler's records, local histories, town and municipal records and contemporary newspaper accounts-the study traces the forces and events which made the elm a ubiquitous feature of the Yankee scene, and a core element in the identity and image of the region.

The historical narrative begins with a description of the tree in the pre-European era, and explains how cultural disturbance by both native Americans and colonists amplified the elm's presence in the landscape. Subsequent chapters examine the tree first as a solitary or totemic artifact in the landscape, and then as a element which, following a region-wide " village improvement movement " in the 1840s, was planted in vast numbers in villages, towns and cities. The totemic elm endowed Yankee space with meaning, as a civic centerpiece, a relic of antiquity, or a monument to specific historical events or persons. Planted en masse as a street tree, elms changed the...