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Product development timing and cost analysis using information flow modeling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128097D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 6 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Carrascosa, Maria: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-36: URL

Abstract

In product development processes. coupled tasks are mutually dependent for information. and there is not a clear sequence in which these tasks should be performed. In this thesis we set to answer the following questions (1) what is the proper ordering in which the tasks should be started and (2) what is the appropriate degree of overlap or concurrence between coupled tasks. A mathematical model has been developed based on characterizing the information exchanged between tasks using the probability of change and impact. The probability of change captures the likelihood of the information changing over the course of performing a task and the impact represents the rework generated by a change in the task receiving the information. The model () 1 estimates the probability of the process being completed as a function of time and (2) provides the average completion time and cost of the development effort for a given degree of concurrence and task sequencing. These results then provide the basis for determining the appropriate task sequence and degree of concurrency to minimize development time and cost. The model was tested in product development settings at HewlettPackard and at General Motors. In addition to the case studies, the model has been used to define a set of general rules for sequencing tasks over a wide range of product development situations. Thesis Supervisor: Steven Eppinger Title: GM LFM Associate Professor of Management Thesis Supervisor: Daniel Whitney Title: Senior Research Scientist, Center for Technology Policy and Industrial Development

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-36 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

Product Development Timing and Cost Analysis Using Information Flow Modeling

by

Maria Carrascosa
M.S., Mechanical Engineering Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1995 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

June 1999
SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Mechanical Engineering

May 6, 1999
CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Steven Eppinger GM LFM Associate Professor of Management Science Thesis Supervisor Daniel Whitney

Senior Research Scientist, CTPID; Lecturer, Department of Mechanical Engineering Thesis Supervisor
Lawrence Wein
Professor of Management Committee Member Warren Seering
Professor of Mechanical Engineering Chairman of Thesis Committee ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Ain A. Sonin Department Committee of Graduate Students ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES JUL 12 1999

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

Page 2 of 6

Product development timing and cost analysis using information flow modeling

Product Development Timing and Cost Analysis Using Information Flow Modeling

by

Maria Carrascosa

Submitted to the Department of Mechanical Engineering on May b, 99 in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of

Doctor of Philosophy in Mechanical Engineering

ABSTRACT

In product development processes. coupled tasks are mutually dependent for information. and there is not a clear sequence in which these tasks should be performed. In this thesis we set to answer the following questions (1) what is the proper ordering in which the tasks should be started and (2) what is the appropriate degree of overlap or concurrence between coupled tasks.

A mathematical model has been developed based on characterizing the information exchanged between tasks using the probability of change and impact. The probability of change captures the likelihood of the information changing over the course of performing a task and the impact represents the rework generated by a change in the task receiving the information. The model () 1 estimates the probability of the process being completed as a function of time and (2) provides the average completion time and cost of the development effort for a given degree of concurrence and task sequencing. These results then provide the basis for determining the appropriate task sequence and degree of concurrency to minimize development time and cost.

The model was tested in product development settings at HewlettPackard and at General Motors. In addition to the case studies, the model has been used to define a set of general rules for sequencing tasks over a wide ra...