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Designing effective portfolio variety using customer need discrimination thresholds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128104D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 4 page(s) / 18K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Roberson, Jo Ruetta: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-102: URL

Abstract

In order to develop a robust product portfolio one must first consider the reeds of the market and create the ability to satisfy those needs through a good product architecture. To be successful, the link between a population's distribution of customer needs and the design of the product portfolio architecture created to address those needs must be understood. This thesis describes a method to determine which customer needs on a vehicle should have multiple levels offered to diversify the market coverage and in what order to expand the levels as more products are permitted in the portfolio. The methodology is formulated as a general optimization problem in which the number of levels on an attribute is balanced against the constraints of multiple variants that can be accommodated through manufacturing. This optimization approach is used to design a platform for a sport utility vehicle and its supported product variants. Thesis Supervisor: Kevin N. Otto Title: Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering [2] 'Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths." Proverbs 3:5-6

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 38% of the total text.

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-102 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

Designing Effective Portfolio Variety Using Customer Need Discrimination Thresholds

by

Jo Ruetta Roberson
B.S., Mechanical Engineering (1996) Prairie View A&M University Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

June 1999
SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Mechanical Engineering

May 7, 1999
CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Kevin N. Otto Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Ain A. Sonin Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES JUL 12 1999

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

Page 2 of 4

Designing effective portfolio variety using customer need discrimination thresholds

Designing Effective Portfolio Variety Using Customer Discrimination Thresholds

By JoRuetta Roberson

Submitted to the Department of Mechanical Engineering On May 7, 1999 in partial fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

ABSTRACT

In order to develop a robust product portfolio one must first consider the reeds of the market and create the ability to satisfy those needs through a good product architecture. To be successful, the link between a population's distribution of customer needs and the design of the product portfolio architecture created to address those needs must be understood. This thesis describes a method to determine which customer needs on a vehicle should have multiple levels offered to diversify the market coverage and in what order to expand the levels as more products are permitted in the portfolio. The methodology is formulated as a general optimization problem in which the number of levels on an attribute is balanced against the constraints of multiple variants that can be accommodated through manufacturing. This optimization approach is used to design a platform for a sport utility vehicle and its supported product variants.

Thesis Supervisor: Kevin N. Otto Title: Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

[2]

'Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and lean not on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge Him, and He shall direct your paths."

Proverbs 3:5-6

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

First, I would like to give thanks to my Heavenly Father who made all this possible. Thank you for being who you are - full of love, mercy, truth, and power. I know that without you I am nothing. My prayer is that you will keep me in your perfect will, " For Always " because I never want to let you down.

I would like to dedicate this thesis to my father, the Late Reve...