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The effects of fuel volatility and operating conditions on sprays from pressure-swirl fuel injectors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128107D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 9 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

VanDerWege, Brad A: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-42: URL

Abstract

Optimal design of modern direct injection gasoline engines depends heavily on the fuel spray. Most of the studies published regarding these fuel sprays involve cold bench tests or motored optical engines, neglecting the roles of the fuel volatility and temperature. This study, therefore, was designed to describe changes in the spray properties due to fuel volatility and operating conditions using a firing optically-accessible engine. Planar laserinduced fluorescence and planar Mie scattering imaging experiments were performed to show changes in the spray structure, including its radial and axial penetration. Phase-Doppler particle analysis experiments were included to track the droplet diameter and velocity at various points throughout the spray. A computational fluid dynamics model was also used to study the physics leading to the observed changes.

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-42 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

The Effects of Fuel Volatility and Operating Conditions on Sprays from Pressure-Swirl Fuel Injectors

by

Brad A. VanDerWege
B.S., Mechanical Engineering (1994) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

M.S., Mechanical Engineering (1996) Massachusetts Institute of Technology Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology June 1999
SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Mechanical Engineering

June 1999
CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Simone Hochgreb Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Ain A. Sonin Chairman, Departmental Graduate Committee ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES JUL 12 7999

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

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The effects of fuel volatility and operating conditions on sprays from pressure-swirl fuel injectors

[2]

The Effects of Fuel Volatility and Operating Conditions on Sprays from Pressure-Swirl Fuel Injectors

By Brad A. VanDerwege

Submitted to the Department of Mechanical Engineering on May 7, 1999 in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

ABSTRACT

Optimal design of modern direct injection gasoline engines depends heavily on the fuel spray. Most of the studies published regarding these fuel sprays involve cold bench tests or motored optical engines, neglecting the roles of the fuel volatility and temperature. This study, therefore, was designed to describe changes in the spray properties due to fuel volatility and operating conditions using a firing optically-accessible engine. Planar laserinduced fluorescence and planar Mie scattering imaging experiments were performed to show changes in the spray structure, including its radial and axial penetration. Phase-Doppler particle analysis experiments were included to track the droplet diameter and velocity at various points throughout the spray. A computational fluid dynamics model was also used to study the physics leading to the observed changes.

The results show that the spray structure changes with not only ambient gas density, which is often measured, but also fuel temperature and volatility. The mean droplet diameter was found to decrease substantially with increasing fuel temperature and decreasing ambient density. Under conditions of low potential for vaporization, the observed trends agree with published correlations for pressure-swirl atomizers. As ambient density decreases and fuel temperature increases, the volatile ends of multi-component fuels evaporate quickly, producing a vapor core along the axis of the spray. Beyond a certain point, evaporatio...