Browse Prior Art Database

Throughput improvement initiatives in an automotive assembly plant body shop

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128112D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-14
Document File: 5 page(s) / 19K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Cassidy, Mark: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-67: URL

Abstract

In most manufacturing environments, the closer you get to the production floor, the shorter and shorter becomes the reference time frame... down to the order of minutes and seconds. Much time is devoted to dealing with daily production issues such as equipment downtime, parts shortages, operator situations, and other daily throughput issues. Such activities are commonly referred to as firefighting. Put out one fire, then move on to the next. Unfortunately, little time or resources are left to concentrate on the time frame that really affects the sustainability of an organization. That time frame is the future and the concern is what continuous improvement methods are in place to ensure a sustainable future?

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-67 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

Throughput Improvement Initiatives in an Automotive Assembly Plant Body Shop

by

Mark Cassidy
BASc. in Mechanical Engineering, University of Toronto, 1995 Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering
Sloan School of Management

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

May 1999 [JUNE 1999]

SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Mechanical Engineering Sloan School of Management

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

David Hardt Thesis Supervisor Professor of Mechanical Engineering Donald Rosenfield

Thesis Supervisor Sloan School of Management

ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Ain Sonin Chairman Department Committee on Graduate Students Mechanical Engineering Department Lawrence Abeln
Director of the MBA Program Sloan School of Management

ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES JUL 12 1899

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

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Throughput improvement initiatives in an automotive assembly plant body shop

Throughput Improvement Initiatives in an Automotive Assembly Plant Body Shop

by

Mark Cassidy

Submitted to the Sloan School of Management and the Department of Mechanical Engineering in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degrees of Master of Business Administration And Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Abstract

In most manufacturing environments, the closer you get to the production floor, the shorter and shorter becomes the reference time frame... down to the order of minutes and seconds. Much time is devoted to dealing with daily production issues such as equipment downtime, parts shortages, operator situations, and other daily throughput issues. Such activities are commonly referred to as firefighting. Put out one fire, then move on to the next. Unfortunately, little time or resources are left to concentrate on the time frame that really affects the sustainability of an organization. That time frame is the future and the concern is what continuous improvement methods are in place to ensure a sustainable future?

The main objective of this project was to help improve throughput in an automotive assembly plant body shop. Both firefighting and continuous improvement methods affect throughput. An appropriate balance between the two is required to achieve optimal levels of throughput. This thesis attempts to provide methods to firefight more efficiently, shift the focus to continuous improvement, and to highlight the compatibility of the Theory of Constraints and Lean Manufacturing.

The thesis concludes the following:

Firefighting and continuous improvement methods should be data driven to ensure that limited resources are used...