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Applications of expressive footwear

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128122D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15
Document File: 4 page(s) / 16K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Hu, Eric: AUTHOR [+3]

Related Documents

http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-58: URL

Abstract

The design of Expressive Footwear centered on creating as dense a sensing module as possible. Originally, the motivation came from creating a dance performance ill which the dancer is participating directly in the creation of music in the dance performance. In order to accomplish this, a wide variety of sensors and sensing techniques are used to quantify physical parameters of the foot. Once the sensing is accomplished, the resultant data is transformed to music in real time. Recent work has also included using Expressive Footwear in gesture recognition. The development of this system and each of its parts is elaborated upon in this thesis.

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 This record is the front matter from a document that appears on a server at MIT and is used through permission from MIT. See http://theses.mit.edu:80/Dienst/UI/2.0/Describe/0018.mit.theses/1999-58 for copyright details and for the full document in image form.

Applications of Expressive Footwear

by

Eric Hu
Submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

May 1999 [June 1999]
(c) Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1999. All rights reserved. SIGNATURE OF author: [[signature omitted]]

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

May 21, 1999

CERTIFIED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Joseph Paradiso Principal Research Scientist, MIT Media Lab Thesis Supervisor ACCEPTED BY: [[SIGNATURE OMITTED]]

Arthur C. Smith Chairman, Department Committee on Graduate Students ARCHIVES MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY LIBRARIES JUL 15 1999

Massachusetts Institute of Technology Page 1 Dec 31, 1999

Page 2 of 4

Applications of expressive footwear

Applications of Expressive Footwear

By

Eric Hu

Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science on May 21, 1999, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Abstract

The design of Expressive Footwear centered on creating as dense a sensing module as possible. Originally, the motivation came from creating a dance performance ill which the dancer is participating directly in the creation of music in the dance performance. In order to accomplish this, a wide variety of sensors and sensing techniques are used to quantify physical parameters of the foot. Once the sensing is accomplished, the resultant data is transformed to music in real time. Recent work has also included using Expressive Footwear in gesture recognition. The development of this system and each of its parts is elaborated upon in this thesis.

Thesis Supervisor: Joseph Paradiso Title: Principal Research Scientist, MIT Media Lab

[2]

Acknowledgments

I would like to acknowledge and thank Joe Paradiso for all. of his guidance, support and vision throughout this project.

I would like to acknowledge and thank I{ai-yuh Hsiao for all of his resourefulness and creativity.

I would also like to thank and acknowledge Andrew Wilson for his innovation and selflessness.

Others I would like to thank for their help and technical expertise are Matt Gray, Joshua Strickon, Rehmi Post, Matt Reynolds, Ari Adler, Ari Benbasat and Zoe Teegarden.

For their help in performance matters, I would like to thank David Borden and Byron Suber of Cornell University as well as Yuying Chen, Mia Iteinanen, Sarall Brady and Brian Clarkson.

Jack Memishian from Analog Devices deserves thanks as does Kyung Park from AMP Sensors (now Measurement Specialists). The Things That Think consortiu...