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Microprogammed System Organization for Small Computers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128262D
Original Publication Date: 1972-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15
Document File: 6 page(s) / 93K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Coulouris, G.F: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Since the commencement of the project in September 1971, research has progressed well and is developing rapidly, both in the directions spelt out in the original proposals and in several new directions that have emerged from interactions between this work and related topics. Powerful facilities for the design, implementation and evaluation of microprograms and systems software are now available on the project's Interdata Model 4 computer. Following delays in hardware commissioning very rapid progress was made in the design and implementation of a suite of software to support programming and microprogramming research. The resultant operating system and related programs now provide facilities for program development comparable to good time-sharing systems. (See Report R9.) Several extensions to the hardware have been made out of local resources.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 22% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

Microprogammed System Organization for Small Computers

by G. F. Coulouris.

Microprogrammed System Organisation for Small Computers [ title ]

(Science Research Council Grant B/RG/500) Annual Report 1971/72 by G.F. Coulouris

MEMBERS Report No. 10 Department of Computer Science & Statistics, Queen Mary College, Mile End Road, London, E.1 September 1972

Summary of Progress

Since the commencement of the project in September 1971, research has progressed well and is developing rapidly, both in the directions spelt out in the original proposals and in several new directions that have emerged from interactions between this work and related topics.

Powerful facilities for the design, implementation and evaluation of microprograms and systems software are now available on the project's Interdata Model 4 computer. Following delays in hardware commissioning very rapid progress was made in the design and implementation of a suite of software to support programming and microprogramming research. The resultant operating system and related programs now provide facilities for program development comparable to good time-sharing systems. (See Report R9.) Several extensions to the hardware have been made out of local resources.

Commissioning of the Writable Control Store required for the execution of microprograms was seriously delayed by the supplier and was not completed until August 1972. Fortunately, the impact of this was minimised by the availability of a software simulator for microprogram testing.

The FLUID language for real-time and systems programming has been defined (R5, TN2) and its associated micro-programmed interpretive system is largely specified (TN5, Specs. 2/GFC, 1/PM, 1/BN). Parts of the interpreter are already implemented, e.g. much of the storage

Queen Mary College Page 1 Sep 01, 1972

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Microprogammed System Organization for Small Computers

management system. The remaining parts are under development. An initial translator from FLUID into its internal representation BIC, is also under development.

Several new approaches to problems in programming language design, operating systems, and computer architecture are being evaluated. Some of these approaches were stated in the original proposals and remain a part of the current work. Others, such as the use of a "working set" model for storage management in a stack environment have emerged more recently.

Related work has been initiated since the commencement of the main grant on the use of small microprogrammable computers for interactive graphics, with Dr. W.M. Newman as Senior Visiting Fellow under a separate SRC-supported project (Ref. B/RG/1405, progress to be reported separately). This collaboration has already proven very fruitful in terms of ideas, software (some very powerful software facilities have been developed by Dr. Newman) and even hardware (e.g. interfacing of external devices to our Interdata e...