Browse Prior Art Database

OVERVIEW OF [RATE - INTERACTIVE RETRIEVAL AND TEXT EDITOR

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128310D
Original Publication Date: 1975-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15
Document File: 10 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

M. Leavitt: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 10% of the total text.

Page 1 of 10

THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

OVERVIEW OF [RATE - INTERACTIVE RETRIEVAL AND TEXT EDITOR

M. Leavitt Mathematics and Computing and C. M. Lederer Nuclear Chemistry Division

Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory University of California Berkeley, Calif. Abstract

A remote-terminal entry/editing system for complex, technical text or structured data has been developed at this 11aboratory. The system has been tested in varied applications. [RATE hardware and software are discussed in brief, and its operational features are described. Some examples of [RATE-produced documents are shown, and potential future development of the system is discussed.

t Work performed under the auspices of the US Energy Research and Development Administration and the US National Bureau of Standards, Office of Standard Reference Data.

This report was entered on the IRATE system and printed by OPTIK, one or several output programs available for general-purpose applications. Final reporduction was done by photo- offset from enlargements or the computer- produced microfilm. OVERVIEW OF IRATE - INTERACTIVE RETRIEVAL AND.TEXT EDrrOR

1. Historical background

IRATE, a remote-terminal system for entry and editing of text or data, was developed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in the early 1970's. rhe present system is actually the third in a series of such systems, whose development wCis motivated by the need for an input-editing device that could routinely handle complextechnical text as well as highly structured data. The original prototype systernt, developed in 1968, consisted of a specially designed keyboard interfaced to an IBM-526 keypunch. Cards produced by the system (each key punched 2 columns) could be read into a computer in order to generate printed output on various devices (ink-pen plotters, CRT plo~ter, or a Linofilm Photo -Composer). This system verified the basic design concepts; in particular, the keyboard design incorporated most of the features utilized in later systems. The prototype also received limited use for entry of bibliographic data, which was included in several reports published by the laboratory. Its most serious deficiency, the lack of a suitable display for provision of immediate feeaback to the typist, led directly to the construction of a second prototype, incorporating a storage - osci I losope display screen. The second system2 consisted of a single terminal (keyboard plus display screen) interfaced to a small computer (PDP8/1). The data were stored on d magnetic disk during use, and then transferred to or from magnetic tape for permanent storage or editing. The second prototype received somewhat more use and generated interest in a broader range of applications. The decision to develop the third (current) system was based on several factors:

1) There was a need for multiple terminals that could be operated simultaneously. This requirement was impractical to implement on the existing systerrf. 2) Editin...