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COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION IN TAIWAN - AN AFIPS INTERNSHIP REPORT

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128355D
Original Publication Date: 1973-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15
Document File: 4 page(s) / 17K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Clarence A. Ellis: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

My first class of teaching, "Computer Systems and Languages," in the National Chiao Tung University held my first surprise. After the class, I said, "That's all for today; class is dismissed." Nobody moved from their seatt I realized that perhaps these people of Taiwan could not understand my English -- nobody had asked any questions during the entire classl So I said very slowly: "Class is finished; you may go now." Still nobody moved an inch. What was I to do? I simply left the class and then every-body followed. I found out later during my year in Taiwan that it is con-sidered bad manners for students to leave the classroom before the teacher and that 90% of the students understood 90% of my lecture. The students in my classes were hard-working with a very strong background in theory and mathematics, but they had a noticeable lack of practical experience.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

COMPUTER SCIENCE EDUCATION IN TAIWAN - AN AFIPS INTERNSHIP REPORT

by Clarence A. Ellis Department of Computer Science University of Colorado

TR #CU-CS-019-73 June My first class of teaching, "Computer Systems and Languages," in the National Chiao Tung University held my first surprise. After the class, I said, "That's all for today; class is dismissed." Nobody moved from their seatt I realized that perhaps these people of Taiwan could not understand my English -- nobody had asked any questions during the entire classl So I said very slowly: "Class is finished; you may go now." Still nobody moved an inch. What was I to do? I simply left the class and then every-body followed. I found out later during my year in Taiwan that it is con-sidered bad manners for students to leave the classroom before the teacher and that 90% of the students understood 90% of my lecture. The students in my classes were hard-working with a very strong background in theory and mathematics, but they had a noticeable lack of practical experience.

The school where I taught has more experience concerning hardware than most because they have built a small mini-computer and have complete labora-tory facilities for fabrication of integrated circuits. National Chiao Tung University (NCTU) currently has another on-going project to build a modular scientific computer. Thus, they have a good set of electrical engineering courses implemented and plan to add more computer courses to form an independent Computer Science Department and degree in late 1972 or 1973.

Another school with strong computer offerings is the National Taiwan University which offers a computer science option within the Electrical Engineoring Dopartment. The Digital Electronics Laboratory at Talwan 0111-versity lins two major projects under investigation: 1) Time Division Tele-phone Systems, and 2) the building of a mini-computer.

The first independent Computer Science Department was established at Fong Ja College of Engineering and Commerce which also offers a wide selec-tion of computer-oriented courses. A list of the computer-related course offerings of these three schools is given in the Appendix. No other schools in Taiwan currently have a Computer Science Department.

During my year as Computer Intern at NCTU, I was attempting to help strengthen their software course offerings. Taiwan has not yet reached any software crisis in that the number of people available who can program computers is sufficient to fill all positions. Traditionally, the Chinese business organizations are conservative in nature and have avoided overly ambitious use of computers. The applications are typically low-level and generally do not require sophisticated software development. The largest computer in Taiwan is an IBM 360/50. IBM is the leading computer manufac-turer in sales in Taiwan followed by Control Data Corporation. Univac, Honeywell, and NCR are re...