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RAMP Architecture in a Utility Calculator System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000128381D
Original Publication Date: 1969-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Sep-15
Document File: 13 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

Software Patent Institute

Related People

Mills, David L.: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This report describes an experimental multi-user utility calculator system similar to PIL, BASIC and FOCAL, but implemented as a subsystem in RAMP, a multiprogramming system described elsewhere. The features or this system include text editing, statement interpretation and expression evaluation as in the other systems cited. In addition, this system provides the capability of multitasking at the source language level. Thus each user can specify a program structure consisting of a number of asynchronous tasks which interact with each other in interesting ways. This report was prepared using FORMAT, a computer program in MIS, the Michigan Terminal System. This program is described in: Berns, G.M., Description of FORMAT, A Text-Processing Program, Comm. ACM, 12, 3 (March 1969), pp. 141 - 146. The text was entered to this program partly in punched-card form and partly directly from a typewriter terminal and was printed on an IBM 1403 printer equipped with a TN print train.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 9% of the total text.

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THIS DOCUMENT IS AN APPROXIMATE REPRESENTATION OF THE ORIGINAL.

RAMP Architecture in a Utility Calculator System

David L. Mills

CONCOMP: Research in Conversational Use of Computers
F. H. Westervelt, Project Director ORA Project 07449

supported by: ADVANCED RESEARCH PROJECTS AGENCY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE WASHINGTON, D.C.

CONTRACT NO. DA-49-083 OSA-3050 ARPA ORDER NO. 716

administered through QFFICE OF RESEARCH ADMINISIRATION ANN ARBOR May 1969

RAMP Architecture in a Utility Calculator System

ABSTRACT

This report describes an experimental multi-user utility calculator system similar to PIL, BASIC and FOCAL, but implemented as a subsystem in RAMP, a multiprogramming system described elsewhere. The features or this system include text editing, statement interpretation and expression evaluation as in the other systems cited. In addition, this system provides the capability of multitasking at the source language level. Thus each user can specify a program structure consisting of a number of asynchronous tasks which interact with each other in interesting ways. This report was prepared using FORMAT, a computer program in MIS, the Michigan Terminal System. This program is described in: Berns, G.M., Description of FORMAT, A Text-Processing Program, Comm. ACM, 12, 3 (March 1969), pp. 141 - 146. The text was entered to this program partly in punched-card form and partly directly from a typewriter terminal and was printed on an IBM 1403 printer equipped with a TN print train.

RAMP Architecture in a Utility Calculator System

TABLE OF CONTENTS

University of Michigan Page 1 May 01, 1969

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RAMP Architecture in a Utility Calculator System

1. Introduction.....1
2. System Architecture.....3
3. Language Specifications.....7
3.1 Expressions.....7
3.2 Statements.....10
4. Operating Conventions.....14
5. References.....16
Appendix A. Error Diagnostic Dictionary.....17
Appendix B. A Recursive Program to Calculate Factorials.....16
Appendix C. A Number-Cruncher to Calculate Transmission Line Characteristics.....19

RAMP Architecture in a Utility Calculator System

1. INTRODUCTION

As an experiment not only in an application of the techniques discussed in the various RAMP reports (see references at the end of this report) but in the utility of carrying the multiprogramming operations to the statement level in an algebraic programming system, a utility calculator similar to PL1, BASIC and FOCAL has been implemented around the basic RAMP supervisor. Besides being capable or sustaining several users simultaneously, the system allows each user to define and execute a number of asynchronous tasks which can interact with each other in interesting real-time fashions.

The system is written for an 8K PDP-8 with an additional teletypewriter interface. This provides a two- user system which can be expanded without reprogramming by adding more teletypewriter interfaces to serve as many users as reasonable within memory-size and response-time limitations. If th...